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tv   U.S. House of Representatives Legislative Business  CSPAN  December 2, 2015 12:00pm-7:01pm EST

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a major overhaul. we are on the verge of making it happen. he's talking about the rewrite of the 2002 law, no child left behind. that's part of the agenda today on the house floor. we take you there live here on c-span. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the prayer will be offered by our chaplain, father conroy. chaplain conroy: let us pray. eternal god we give you thanks for giving us another day. once again we come to you to ask wisdom, patience, peace and understanding for the members of this people's house. give them the generosity of heart and the courage of true leadership to work toward a common solution to the many issues facing our nation. as true statesmen and women, may they find the fortitude to make judgments to benefit all americans at this time and those
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generations to come. may all that is done this day be for your greater honor and glory, amen. the speaker: the chair has examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house his approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1, the journal stands approve the pledge of allegiance will be led by the gentleman from illinois, mr. quigley. mr. quigley: i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will entertain up to 15 requests for one-minute speeches on each side of the aisle. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas rise? mr. johnson: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. r. johnson: thank you.
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mr. speaker, i share the concerns of the majority of americans regarding allowing syrian refugees into this country. most important i'm worried that a terrorist could slip through just like one of the terrorists involved in paris. but we also can't lose sight of another vulnerability, a geographical vulnerability, our southern border. because our border is not secure, this president refuses to secure it. yesterday i spoke with the director in texas, steve mcgraw, of the department of public safety, and he made it very clear that we are seeing another surge at the border. we are seeing folks from syria come across. this is thrubbling -- troubling and wrong. the president must secure our border and protect our national security.
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if he refuses, we in this congress must stop him by any means possible. yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois seek recognition? mr. quigley: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. quigley: thank you, mr. speaker. weeks ago this body avoided a government shut down by passing the bipartisan budget act. now we have to pass an omnibus. unfortunately, many of our appropriation bills contain divisive policy riders that threaten to create another partisan standoff. there is an appropriate time and place to debate these provisions. in the authorizing committees. it seems some members have learned nothing from the brinksmanship that almost led to a government shutdown. it is hard enough to pass these measures without these divisive, controversial riders. we need to put the unnecessary
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fighting behind us, the bipartisan budget act represents a chance for us to return to reasonable compromises and regular order. i call upon my colleagues to follow up on that accomplishment and pass a clean omnibus package. thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yield back. for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina seek recognition? mr. wilson: unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. mr. wilson: mr. speaker, last saturday marked the fifth annual small business saturday. a day when we recognize the importance of local businesses by shopping at these community businesses. saturday's event was particularly meaningful to small businesses in south carolina, many of which were recovering from the tragic 1,000-year flood in october. in south carolina over half of our state's work force is employed by small business. congress must do more to protect these vital job creators from excessive taxes and regulations. i am grateful to the national federation of independent
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business, nfib, along with the u.s. chamber of commerce, encouraged by the south carolina chamber of commerce, led by ted pitts, as well as cal chambers in lexington, greater aiken, orangeburg, and others for their support of small business across the second district of south carolina. in conclusion, god bless our troops and may the president by his actions never forget september 11 and the global war on terrorism. the speaker pro tempore: the time of the gentleman has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from new york seek recognition? without objection, so ordered. mr. higgins: the department of defense transferred a service record to the national archives 62 years after they are discharged from the military. is00,000 per year requested to determine eligibility for a medal, to research one's medical history or request a change in discharge status.
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the department of defense provides records to veterans for free, once they are sent to the archives, veterans are charged $25 to $75 for a copy of their file. mr. speaker, this is unacceptable a veteran should have pate the government for proof of their sfifes and service. once more this fee is leff have ied on veterans who are most likely living on a fixed income. this fee is unnecessary and inexcusable. i ask my colleagues to support legislation i'm introducing today to eliminate t i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from indiana seek recognition? mrs. walorski: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlelady is recognized. mrs. walorski: thank you, mr. speaker. it's with great sadness and a heavy heart that i rise today to honor and remember 18-year-old ezra schwartz, a massachusetts teenager whose life was tragically taken in israel last month. he was depend spending his gap
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year studying at a yishiva in israel who was shot and killed last week by a palestinian terrorist. the continued violent attacks targeting israeli civilians are without qualification or exception acts of terror and deserve full condemnation. attacks on innocent civilians, whether they are american, israeli, or palestinian have zero justification and our response to such terrorism cannot be silenced. my heart and prayers go out to the friend and family of ezra and we honor those whose lives have been lost by such hateful actions. please join me in remembering the young life of ezra and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. for what purpose does the gentleman from rhode island seek recognition? mr. cicilline: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. mr. cicilline: mr. speaker, last friday a planned parenthood clinic incolorado springs became the target of the 351st mass shooting in the united states this year. three people were killed in iraq war veteran, mother of
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tureks and local police officer. they are now among the more than 12,000 americans who have died in gun related incidents since the start of the year. the shooter in colorado springs is reported to have used a semiautomatic ak-47-style firearm. an assault weapon that has its origins in stalin's soviet army. this firearm and others like it are weapons of war not tools for self-defefpblets this serve no purpose other than kifment we can no longer permit the proliferation of and easy access to these weapons nunts. that's why in the coming weeks i'll introduce legislation that re-authorizes the assault weapons ban. during the 10 years this ban was in effect, localities reported as much as a 72% decline in gun crime involving assault weapons. and today 59% of american voters support a ban on the purchase of semiautomatic and assault weapons. the only thing that stands in the way is dong's -- congress' failure to act. the time for action is now. i thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back the balance of my time.
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the speaker pro tempore: the time of the gentleman has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from florida seek recognition? >> unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to honor and recognize a floridian who has spent the last two decades making sure our veterans and their acts are never forgotten. i rise today to commend john j. piazza senior, the founder and president of the armed forces military museum in largo, florida. mr. jolly: a veteran himself, he served from 1955 to 1960. and the u.s. marine corps and marine corps reserve. in 1998 he founded the armed forces military ue seem, exhibiting a personal collection assemble into a mobile museum with heavy equipment displayed at schools, community events, and the florida state fair. in 2008 he was able to fulfill his dream of opening a permanent home for great vehicles morabilia, and equipment, both his own and those donated by those hoe have served mr. speaker, today he celebrates his birthday and i urge my colleagues to not only join me in sending him very best wishes but to thank john
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for his lifelong dedication to honoring the american heroes who have served our nation and for helping educate the young men and women who today have the opportunity to learn about valor and sacrifice in arrest armed forces in largo, florida. mr. speaker, thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. today i rise to urge my colleagues to support the displaced jobs relief act of 2015. bill i introduced yesterday to help small businesses that have been hurt by foreign competition. the inland empire of california fights back from the great recession, we need to make sure we use every tool available to help our small businesses reef cover. they were dealt heavy blows in
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the past decade both from the weakened economy and flawed trait agreements. international trade plays and important role in our economy, but his interests taught us not all agreements are fair. sometimes they take a toll on local businesses that don't have the ability to handle unfair foreign competition. that's why i interdutiesed this bill -- the inland empire intro the trade adjustment assistance has played a crucial role in placing americans in good paying jobs for generations. if we increase the availability of funds, we can help protect hardworking americans from losing business to unfair competition overseas. my bill would increase the authorization for t.a.a. for businesses up to $50 million for each fiscal year beginning in 2016 and running through 2021. mr. aguilar: these programs have always authorized $50 million a year and in fiscal year 2011 house republicans cut the levels to $16 million. barely 30% of what funding was. this is an important program that can help businesses in the inland empire and across the nation and i urge my colleagues to support me and this act for the sake of american workers and businesses.
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the speaker pro tempore: the time of the gentleman has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia seek recognition? >> ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore:, without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise today to remember chatham county sheriff st. lawrence. last tuesday he died after a long fight with cancer. he was 81 years old. he was a dedicated law enforcement professional for . atam -- chatham county a u.s. air force fete ran he joined the police department in 1959 after leaving the service. mr. carter: he was appointed to the state peace officers standards and training council twice. he was named police chief of the year three times during his tenure. in 1992, he ran for sheriff and won, being re-elected five times. in his 20 years as sheriff, he oversaw numerous changes to the department, including the construction of a new jail. he was a gentleman.
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a professional. and a mentor. he was a man of few words and believed in personal responsibility. he loved the sheriff's department and loved the people that worked there. i commend him for years of service to his country and to the sheriff's department. we should all strive to achieve the success and admiration that sheriff st. lawrence achieved through his years of service. thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois seek recognition? >> unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, we have seen an la ar over the death of quan mcdonald and rightfully so. sadly the injustice for him goes deeper. mr. foster: he suffered more tragedy in his short life than anyone should have to bear. as a child, he was abused at home. he was then handed over to the department of children and
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family services where he was sexually molested not just once but in two different foster homes. at 17 years old, la quan was shot 16 times by an on duty police officer. even after death the injustice continued the. it took 400 days before the officer who shot him faced charges. we should all be ashamed at how our society failed him. mr. speaker, i rise today to remind my colleagues that black lives matter. that la' quan's life matters and justice matters. we should all be working to minimum wage sure that he gets the justice he has been denied for so long and to end the cycle of poverty, abuse, and injustice that shaped his life. thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from new york seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to
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address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized. >> mr. speaker, i rise today to continue to lead the fight to repeal the medical device tax. this is a tax on revenue rather than troft. ms. stefanik: it leads to some of the highest corporate tax rates in the world and creates undue harm to an industry that not only creates jobs but also improves our health and well-being. a company located in my district employs over 80 people and produces stents and other vascular equipment. the medical device tax prevents them from increasing their budget on research and development by 15%. angiodynamic, another company in my district, employees 150 people and develops many devices including the an fwmbings iovac system to treat blood clots. recently, they said the $1
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on medicaliovac pays devices could be used to employee another 10 to 15 people. we must repeal this tax to create jobs and improve patient outcome. thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. the bipartisan budget agreement signed into law last month helped avert another manufactured political crisis here in washington, but our work is not done. if we don't pass a spending bill before december 11, working americans, seniors, will face another dangerous government shutdown. sadly, republican leadership continues to threaten this process over radical policy riders like defunding planned parenthood. mr. kildee: unfortunately, in
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his first press conference, the new speaker, could not rule out another republican government shutdown. as we face tremendous threats, national security threats, we need to set politics aside. i mean, some things in this house have to be exempt from the political gamesmanship and we would certainly think that keeping government open and functioning would be one of the things we take out of the olitical conversation. the american people want taos do our job. our job is to make sure that this government runs, and we can't do that if we continue to use politics and the threat of a government shutdown to achee what can't be achieved through the normal legislative process. mr. speaker, we need to do our job. with that, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from new york seek recognition?
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without objection the gentleman s recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to honor one of wayne county, new york's, most dedicated publicer is vabts, jim hoffman, and send him off on a great retirement. his public service career began when he enlisted in the navy as a young man. he continued by serving the police, 10 years as chairman of the wayne county board of supervisors. under his leadership, wayne county is a better place to live. he's lower taxes in williamson, kept tacks stable across the county, supported the region's vast community of growers and farmers, emerged as a leader in helped to n 2014 and
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make all of williamsson county work on solar powerment he has represented the 24th o-- he has helped me in my time serbing the people of the 24th district. jim, congratulations to you on the -- on a long and distinguished career. enjoy your time with our children and grandchildren. god bless. i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the time of the gentleman has expired. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from new hampshire seek recognition? without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. >> today i rise to talk about our efforts in afghanistan. i had the chance to join phi other colleagues from the veterans affairs committee for a trip to spend the holiday with our outstanding service men and women in kabul, kandahar, and bagram air force base. additionally, we received
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numerous briefings in numerous military, state department and other officials. we heard about the multitude of challenges facing the young democracy in afghan, ranging from hard security challenges emanating from the taliban, al qaeda and isil, to societal challenges in a country with 92% illiteracy. ms. kuster: this is now primarily an afghan fight with just over 9,00 american troops remaining in country. however the threat of international terrorism and the need to ensure the country never again becomes a haven for those seeking to target the united states means we need to have a presence in afghanistan for some time to come. i was encouraged by the dedication of the men and women in uniform who continued to demonstrate their commitment to our mission. i was also encouraged by the resolve demonstrated by afghan president ghani to reduce corruption and rebuild the economy. make no mistake, afghanistan faces many challenges in the years ahead but with the help of
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the united states of america, the international community, the tenacity of the after began ladders, and some good luck, the afghan people can hope for peace and greater prosperity in the future. thank you, mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the time of the gentlewoman has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. poe: mr. speaker, bullet holes are still visible in the walls of cafe the graves are fresh for those lives stolen by isis fighters in the streets of paris. meanwhile, the president is in paris, talking about his priority, the real threat, climate change. while america has been unable or unwilling to defeat isis, it has been front and center in the war on climate change. former c.i.a. director mike morell said we didn't go after the oil wells, hitting oil wells
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that isis controlled, because we didn't want to do environmental damage. the president has the sided that the threat to the environment is more serious to him than the threat of isis terrorism. mr. speaker, oil funds isis' murderous reign of terror but the president's new limited war doctrine has one rule of engidgement. no climate casualties. mr. speaker, it's time for bombs to rain down over the isis war chest. stop the flow of the blood money, oil. not one more life should be lost because of a negligent and backwards strategy of a limited war based on climate change. a war that promotes not harming the environment over harming people. that's just the way it is. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yield back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from connecticut eek recognition? without objection the gentlelady s recognized for one minute.
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>> thank you, mr. speaker. yesterday this house rose once again to observe a moment of silence for victims of gun violence, this time for the police officer, the veteran, and the mother of two who were gunned down in colorado springs. nearly three years after 20 schoolchildren and six brave educators were shot to death at sandy hook elementary school in my district. it is time for moments of silence to end. it is time for action. gun violence is a public health crisis that deserves this house to take action now. that is why we should establish a select committee on gun violence prevention. we are all understandably concerned about terrorism and yet this house just yesterday blocked action to prevent terrorists, those on the terrorist watch list from acquiring deadly weapons to kill americans. it is time for this house to
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truly honor victims of gun violence. i invite my colleagues to join us next week for the third annual national vigil to prevent gun violence on wednesday, december 6. that's december 9. the vigil will be held at st. mark's church on capitol hill. please come, join me, stand with the families and the victims of gun violence, from my district and across the country. thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the time of the gentlewoman has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from minnesota seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. >> mr. speaker, to realize their american dreammark minnesotans rely on access to financial products like business loans and mortgages. not only do these financial instruments benefit individuals and families but help build healthy communities. unfortunately in some rural and urban areas, outdated
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regulations threaten the ability of our community banks to offer these important financial products. together with congresswoman gwen moore i have introduced legislation to address this problem. h.r. 4116 allows community banks have handle deposits over a secure network. mr. emmer: it will allow them to handle these loans without violating fdic insurance policy. this is good for minnesota and i happen to believe what's good for minnesota is good for our country. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from minnesota seek recognition? does the gentleman seek recognition?
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mr. ellison: i do seek recognition. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. ellison: republicans have fought tooth and nail to cut investments in important programs for working families yet they're willing to spend billions on tax expenditures. they want to add riders that gut consumer protections and a woman's right to choose. 5 recent poll found nearly seven in 10 americans agree with the following statement, i feel angry because our political system seems to only be working for the insiders with money and power. as members of congress, i urge colleagues on all sides to come together and heed the american people's wishes and to put their interests up front. we need to make sure that we can pass a budget bill that isn't loaded up with policy riders and more things that would confuse the basic issues. we cannot abide proposal
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attacking national labor relations board and the workers' right to organize. we cannot abide nevert -- efforts to undermine the consumer financial protections bureau, which is helping americans meet their financial needs. we must stand up for the american consumer and we urge, i urge, all parties to come together to reach these important goals. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the time of the gentleman has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> i request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. mr. thompson: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to congratulate shar la detrick on her upcoming etirement as the director of the district. she was promoted to that position in 2001, she previously served a secretary for potter county.
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potter county became the only county to have protection in place for each source of water which is perhaps the most important natural resource. additionally under her leadership, the county's planning department worked to address issues around wind power in the county along with huge expansion of gas drilling in the marcellus shale. potter county recently called charlotte a born planner. i know those skills have been a great asset for the county in the last decade with so many big changes. i wish her the best of luck in retirement and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> i request permission to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. >> i rise to congratulate the university of houston, one of our nation's leading public research universities in its recent string of success inside and outside the classroom.
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mr. green: it was designated a tier one university by the carnegie foundation, one of only texas.ier one in for over 90 years, the university of houston has been providing affordable, world class education to students of harris county and students are come to u of h for its renowned programs and academic training. our chancellor of the school is here in washington today, thanks to her and the board for their leader ship. the university of houston cougars is one of the top college football team this is season, ranked number 11 in the country and with a win of the american athletic conference, goes to a bowl game this weekend. as a native houston tonian and graduate of university of houston, it makes me proud to see the school continuing to
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serve our state, city and country. thank you, mr. speaker, go cougs. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from ohio seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. >> let's get our priorities straight when it comes to american leadership. rather than showing leadership in the fight against isis, or reassuring our allies in this fight, our current administration is still coming -- claims that -- claiming that our greatest threat to national security is, believe it or not, climate change. i'm all about science but we need to be realist as well. the biggest threat, according to them, is not iran or russia or north korea, it's a couple of degrees of temperature change. their government minnesotadates mean higher energy costs for families, less energy reliability, higher manufacturing costs and smaller take-home paychecks. i know that most highway families can't afford this, mr. speaker. coal plants are already shutting
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down up and down the highway river, costing us jobs and reliable energy. we need american leadership that's willing to lead the fight and defeat isis. this week the house voted to protect american families and consumers from the administration's price hikes. let's get our priorities straight, mr. speaker, and bring the fight to isis, not burden ohio families. i yield back. ment the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from florida seek recognition? >> i ask permission to address the house for one minute. revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, the terrorist attacks in paris reminded us that isis recruits, fighters from across the globe, even here at home. mr. deutch: already the f.b.i. has arrested over 60 americans connected with isis. the terrorists who attacked paris got their guns from the black market. here in the united states even suspected terrorists are allowed under federal law to freely and legally buy assault weapons, buy guns, buy
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explosives. the g.a.o. reports that in the last decade suspects on the fib february's terrorist watch list atepted to buy guns and explosives over 2,200 times. guess what? 91% of the time they succeeded. now, i know that the gun lobby opposes any effort to toughen background checks. but can we not at the very least agree that this is a matter of national security? that when the f.b.i. has reasonable suspicion that someone is connected to terror, we should stop him from buying weapons of mass murder. do any of my colleagues on the floor today, is there anyone in congress who actually believes that you should be able to buy a gun while on the terrorist watch list? is there anyone in america who believes that? if you are on the terrorist watch list, you shouldn't buy a gun. can this body please take this meaningful step to protect american families? let's put it to a vote and let's do it before we leave
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here for the holidays. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the time of the gentleman has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one inute. it >> thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to honor the life, legacy, and work of officer lloyd reed jr. who will be remembered for his kind and helpful nature. officer reed, a st. player township pennsylvania police officer was tragically shot and killed last saturday, november 28th, while responding to a domestic dispute. he was an avid trout fisherman and nascar and steelers fan. mr. rothfus: he served his communes commupte as a law enforcement officer before his life was taken. i offer my prayers and deepest condolences to his loved ones,
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friends, colleagues, and wife. all men and women who serve to protect us from harm deserve our deepest gratitude and respect. they choose to risk their lives so the rest of us can lead peaceful, productive, and meaningful lives. officer reeves' life and death are a testament to those who serve honorably. i thank the speaker. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from pennsylvania yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from california seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: ms. lee: thank you. mr. speaker, i rise today to commemorate the life and legacy of congresswoman shirley chisholm. last week she received the presidential medal of freedom, our nation's highest civilian award. congresswoman chisholm is truly deserving of this honor. in 1969 she became the first african-american woman to serve in congress. she was the first majority party african-american candidate, and the first democratic woman to run for president. she was also a founding member of the congressional black
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caucus. congress wovepl chisholm, or mrs. c as we called her, was my mentor and role model. the course of my life changed when i met her as a student at mills college. at that time i was a black student union president and invited her to speak. her speech focused on the power of women and people of color to change the world. as she said, if you don't have a seat at the table, bring a folding chair. she explained why it was important for everyone to get involved in policymaking process because too often the voices of women and people of color are unheard. i know that today many of us, including myself, would not be here. we would not have the privilege to serve in this great body had it not been for shirley chisholm. she is truly deserving of our nation's highest honor. i would also want to wish her a very happy belated birthday. she would have turned 91 on the 20th of november. thank you. i yield the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentlewoman from california yields the balance of her time. for what purpose does the gentleman from iowa seek recognition? >> ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to discuss the environmental protection agency's finalized renewable fuel standard, otherwise known as the r.f.s. the biofuels industry has created good paying technical jobs in rural economy, help lower gas prices for consusmers, protected the environment, and reduced reliance on foreign oil. on monday this week, the e.p.a. finalized levels for 2014, 2015, and 2016. while they are a slight improvement from the proposed rule, they still fall short of congressional intent put into law in 2007. unfortunately, this decision raises questions about the administration's commitment to rural america and domestic biofuels. despite public assurances to support the biofuels economy, the e.p.a. has done just the
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opposite. the disconnect is startling, a reduction in r.f.s. levels increases uncertainty. stifles investment in the advanced biofuel sector. we should all be concerned by the precedents this decision sets for other renewable energy sources. it allows the administration to ignore the facts and the law in order to set a standard of its choosing. the r.f.s. is working. it's time the e.p.a. started listening to the people impacted by the rules and regulations. i'm committed to supporting the biofuels industry, it's producers, farmers, and its consumers and continue fighting against any attempts to undermine it. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the time of the gentleman has expired. for what purpose does the entlewoman from texas seek recognition? ms. jackson lee: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlelady is recognized. ms. jackson lee: thank you so very much, mr. speaker. i want to speak today about what the house will face on educational changes in bringing
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forward s. 1177, every child succeeds act, which takes us away from the no child left behind. i'm delighted the jackson lee amendment offered during the house consideration of the bill dealing with bullying is now in this bill. it is now the law of the land once we pass it. it supports accountability base programs and activities designed to enhance school safety which may include research-based bullying prevention, cyberbullying spreengs, resumption of recruitment activity by groups, gang prevention programs, as well as intervention programs. cnn had a report just last night, i believe, that talked about the extensiveness of cyberbullying. one in seven students in grades k through 12 is either a bully or victim of it. 90% of fourth to eighth grade students report being victims of bullying. 56% personally witnessed some type of bullying. 15% of all students who don't show up for school report they have been bullied. one out of 20 students has been a -- seen a student with a gun at a school.
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2le 2,000 students are physically attacked in secondary schools each month. this is something that is a key part of education. to be in an education environment where you want to learn, where you are protected is keefment let me ask everyone to support this legislation and i'm delighted that we have been able to come together and particular around this issue of preventing bullying and cyberbullying in our schools. i thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from florida seek recognition? ms. ros-lehtinen: i request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. ros-lehtinen: thank you so much, mr. speaker. i rise today to give recognition to best buddies international. an organization that assists individuals with developmental and intellectual disabilities become thriving members of our society. founded in 1989, best buddies international has positively improved the lives of nearly 900,000 individuals. and i'm particularly proud of
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the success of this organization in my home state of florida where programs like best buddies colleges in which schools like my alma mater, florida international university, and the university of miami, participate. this program nurtures one-to-one friendships between college students and adults with i.d.d. so that they can be involved in campus life beyond the classroom. through this and other worthwhile programs, participants create a bond that can truly last a lifetime while becoming inspirational leaders and living a more independent life. i would like to extend my best wishes to best buddies international as it continues on this noble endeavor and encourages all to get involved and support people with special needs and their families. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from north carolina seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one
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minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. >> this week marks the 60th anniversary of the afl-cio. the afl-cio serves as a voice for more than 12 million working americans throughout our nation. s. adams: negotiating with employers, the afl-cio has fought and won better wages, fair hours, and more friendly family policies for millions of americans. i fought alongside the afl-cio for decades and i'll continue to stand with them and our workers. thank you to the president of the north carolina afl-cio, james andrews, to timothy with the central labor council, with the international association of machinists and aerospace workers, and the union for government employees and more than 30 other members of the north carolina afl-cio executive board. thank you. these leaders pour everything they have into fighting for workers in our communities. for more than 60 years, afl-cio has represented the best in our
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unions and given our workers the support they need to stand up for themselves. on this 60th anniversary of afl-cio, let's continue to support our workers by making sure they have wages they can live on, fair hours, retirement protections they deserve, and access to health care they need. i yield back, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from north carolina yields back the balance of her time. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from arizona seek recognition? >> ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlelady is recognized. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to pay tribute to the life of howard henderson, a man who was cherished by many throughout southern arizona. ms. mcsally: howard moved to douglas, arizona, in 1984 when he became the owner and president of two radios stations. he wasted no time making his mark both on the air and in the community. howard hosted the trading post morning show, one of the most popular and listened to shows in the area. he broadcast over 1,000 high
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school games and supported community events, including serving on the local fair board. his on-air personality and presence in douglas earned him the neighboring name mr. wonderful. i got to know howard over recent years. like many i was touched by his professionalism, his grace, and dedication to the community. on november 20, howard passed away after battling cancer at the age of 65. we will miss hearing his voice on the airwaves and seeing his smiling face around douglas. but we will never forget his impact on southern arizona. with that, mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from florida seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for ne minute. if >> mr. speaker, today i rise to honor jefferson county sheriff deputy jaret rigman whose
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askses saveded the life of florida state university student in my district. when he arrived at the crash scene on the morning of october 31, the scene was horrific. the car was mangled, and the freshman student inside had life threatening injuries. his neck was severed and he was quickly losing blood. the deputy quickly assessed the scene, worked to stop the bleeding, and called for a helicopter to airlift the victim. because of his fast response and heroic actions, billy fouler, the 18-year-old freshman in the car, is alive today. i want to thank depp the deputy and all the north florida first responders. thank you for risking your lives to save ours. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the her time. for what purpose does the
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gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. burgess: mr. speaker, by direction of the committee on rules i call up house resolution 542 and ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the resolution. the clerk: house calendar number 77, house resolution 542, resolved, that at any time after the adoption of this resolution, the speaker may, pursuant to clause 2-b of rule 18, declare the house resolved into the committee of the whole house on the student for further consideration of the bill h.r. 8, to modernize energy infrastructure, build a 21st century energy and manufacturing work force, bolster america's energy security and diplomacy, and promote energy efficiency and government accountability and for what purpose does. no ore amendment shall be in order. in lieu of the amendment printed in the bill it shall be in order an original bill
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an amendment in the nature of a substitute consisting of the text of rules committee print 113-36. that amendment in the nature of a substitute shall be considered as read. all points of order on that amendment in the nature of a subs are waived no amendment to that amendment in the nature of a substitute shall be in order expect those printed in the report. they may be offered only in the order printed in the report, shall be considered as read, shall be debatable for the time specified in the report, equally divided and controlled by the poonet -- opponent and proponent, shall not be subject to amendment and shall not be subject to a than for division of the question in the house or the committee of the whole. all points of order against such amendments are waived. at the conclusion of tchoferingse bill for amendment, the committee shall rise and report the bill back to the house with such amendments as adopted. any member may demand a separate vote on any amendment to the
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bill or to the amendment in the nature of a substitute. the previous question shall be considered as ordered without intervening motion except one motion to recommit with or without instructions. section 2. upon adoption of this resolution, it shall be in order to consider the conference report to accompany the bill senate 1177, to re-authorize the elementary and secondary education act of 1955, tone sure that every child achieves. all points of order against the conference report and against its consideration are waived. the conference report shall be considered as read. the previous question shall be considered as ordered on the conference report to its adoption without intervening motion except, one, one hour of debate, and two, one motion to ecommit if applicable. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized for one hour. mr. burgess: thank you, mr.
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speaker. for the purposes of debate only i yield the customary 30 minutes to the gentleman from colorado, mr. polis, pending which i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for such time as he may consume. mr. burgess: during consideration of this, all time yielded is for the purpose of debate only and i ask unanimous consent a thall members have five legislate i days to revise and extend their remark. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, sord ord. mr. burgess: house resolution 543 -- 542 provides for a rull to continue consideration of the comprehensive energy legislation on which the house began its work yesterday. the rule makes in order 38 amendments to be considered on the house floor, 22 sponsored by democratic members of the house, 12 are sponsored by republicans, and four were submitted as bipartisan amendments. further, the minority will be afforded the standard motion to recommit, a final opportunity to amend the bill prior -- prior to passage. hougs resolution 542 further
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provides for a rule to consider the conference report to senate 1177, the student success act which will move the country's education system beyond no child left behind and return the responsibility of educating our children to local and state authorities where it appropriately belongs. as with all conference reports brought before the house the rule provides that debate on the measure will be conducted under the standing rules of the house and will provide -- and will further provide for a motion to recommit, allowing the minority yet another opportunity to amend the legislation before final passage. the amendments that the rules committee made in order allow the house to weigh in on a number of important issues within the sphere of energy policy, from crude oil exports to the federal government's olicy on fossil fuel usage, to
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siting and regulatory reforms at the regulatory commission. i do wish to highlight an amendment that unfortunately was not made in order, one that i submitted to the rules committee as well during the markup of h.r. 8 and the energy -- in the energy and commerce markup. it has become clear to me, working on the energy committee over the past 10 years, that the authority given to the department of energy to regulate and mandate efficiency standards in consumer products was both initially misguided and ultimately has proven to be cumbersome and unworkable. mr. speaker, i have always been a strong believer in energy efficiency. however, government mandated efficiency standards have proven to be the wrong approach. for this reason, i submitted an amendment to repeal the federal energy conservation standards which dictate how energy efficient consumer products must be before they can be sold in
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the united states. these mandates cover products from light bulbs, and there we have successfully blocked it due to overwhelming public outrage, to ceiling fan, air conditioners, to heaters, to furnaces. the list goes on and on. the federal government should not be setting these standards. companies, and more importantly, their customers, should be the driving force in this decision. this is about letting the free market drive innovation and technological advances. the government should trust the people to make the right decisions when it comes to the products that they buy. when the government sets the efficiency standards dard for a product, that often becomes the ceiling. when the market drives the standard there is no limit to how fast and how aggressive manufactures will ultimately be when consumers demand more efficient and better products. government standards have proven to be unworkable. mr. speaker, every single time
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the department of energy proposes to set a new efficiency standard for any product, manufacturers run to their members of congress asking taos sign letters to the department implore them not to set unworkable standards. it's a predictable occurrence for every rule. even in h.r. 8, we're conceding that the department of energy is moving in the wrong direction with furnace standards and congress has to step in and mitigate. in fact, congress should be getting out of the way of the relationship between companies and their customers. how many times during the appropriations process are we asked to vote on amendments blocking the department of energy from regulating consumer products because the federal government does not understand how to run a business. instead of that approach, we should be removing the department of energy's authority altogether. the commerce clause of the united states constitution was
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meant as a limitation on federal power. the framers intended that clause to be used to ensure that commerce could flow freely among the several states. it was never intended to allow the federal government to micromanage everyday consumer products. if the clause were truly meant to be that expansive, then the tenth amendment would be meaningless. there would be no authority left to reserve for the state. this view of the commerce clause was in fact reaffirmed most recently by the supreme court and the national federation of independent business versus sebelius. the commerce clause does not and cannot extend so far as to allow the federal government to regulate products that do not pose a risk to health or safety. there is a place for the f.d.a. to regulate safe food and drugs network national highway traffic administration to regulate the safety of cars on the roads, but
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to give the federal government the authority to regulate how efficient a proukt should be seems to cross a constitutional line. congress has already stepped in to block the department of energy from setting efficiency standards for light bulbs. not because congress got wisdom, it's because the american people understood clearly that this was government overreach at its worst and they demanded it be fixed. but the same can and should be said about every consumer product that the department of energy has been given the authority to regulate in the efficiency space. from light bulbs to furnaces to air conditioners, ceiling fan, department of energy should not be telling manufactures how to make their products. i also want to say one thing about the representative from wyoming, mrs. lummis' amendment to h.r. 8 which was also unfortunately not made in order. this amendment was based in part studies es of g.a.o. that myself and senator markey had commissioned to study the
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department of energy's management of uranium issues and the impact on domestic -- on the domestic uranium mining industry. it is a critical issue for those of us from western states. and it is my hope that as this body continues to work to protect that industry from further legally suspect actions by the department of energy, that mrs. lummis' wishes will be achieved. the education conference report known as the every student succeeds act is a bipartisan compromise to re-authorize and reform our education system. for the past 13 years, our students and our schools have been struggling to meet rigorous and often unrealistic demands of no child left behind. no child left behind attempted to improve school accountability by conditioning increased funding on annual testing requirements and pass rates. 100% of students were supposed
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to be proficient by 2014 with failing schools being required to restructure under federal guidelines. a vote against the every student succeeds act today is a vote is a vote to keep no child left behind in place, to keep the onerous average yearly progress standards in place, and to keep the high stakes testing in place. that so many of our constituents deplore. this compromise that was worked out in committee is a vast improvement, not perfect by any stretch but it is a vast improvement. and really for the first time it moves control back into the hands of states and local districts where it belongs. it eliminates the waiver process by repealing adequate yearly progress. the federal accountability system. for years, school boards in my district have been requesting relief from having to obtain waivers from the department of
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education. this bill will allow local districts to set their own testing requirements and standards to determine whether a student or school is struggling as well as how to improve. common core incentives are eliminated. let me repeat that. common core incentives are eliminated. the federal government created the federal education regulations and mandated their adoption by withholding funds from schools. this intervention is another example of the federal government prescribing its best practices over those schools and teachers who every day get up and go to work to do their best. they know their students. they know how best to teach them. under the every student succeeds act, this stops. this bill also provides new state funding flexibility by allowing states to determine how to spend their federal dollars on average 7% per year. my state, this is more than $225
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million annually, by the state will be able to allocate in the most effective and most efficient way possible. this bill is a four-year authorization. that's an important point. four-year authorization. regardless of how you feel about the current administration, it will not be the current administration in four years' time. that will allow the next administration, whoever he or she may be, the opportunity to better evaluate education programs and my hope is to continue to reduce the federal role for our students, schools, and teachers in texas and throughout the country. mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from colorado is recognized. mr. polis: thank you, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for such time as he may consume. mr. polis: i'm glad the gentleman got to education. we heard nine or 10 minutes about corporal welfare energy
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bill and that's not going anywhere. and -- corporate welfare energy bill and that's not going anywhere. and that's a reason i don't think any democrats will be supporting this bill. but in this bill is also an education bill that we're very excited about, i think a lot of democrats want to tell you about here today. it's exciting to reach this point. i share the frustration of teachers, of parents, of students across the country with no child left behind. i was on the state board of education in colorado from 2001 to 2007 when we implemented no child left behind. we saw many of the flaws at that time. we knew the fallacy of the formula for adequate yearly progress. and it was set up in such -- in such a way that all schools would eventually fail. we saw the rigid structure that could inhibit -- inhibit state and district innovation. i'm proud to say today that the bill under this rule is a major step forward. for those who are thinking of opposing it, realize that in opposing it, you are ensuring
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that no child left behind will continue exactly as is. there's never a perfect alternative. i'm sure if each of us had the opportunity to write our own education bill, we'd have 435 different bills. but what we have before us is a good, realistic compromise that can replace no child left behind with a new federal education law. something that is long overdue for the kids of this country. something that will be a boost in morale to teachers and educators across this country, something that will encourage innovation at the state and district level. and i'll talk about some of those provisions that do just that. just a if weeks ago, i met with teachers and students at rocky mountain high school in fort collins, colorado. they expressed frustration with what has become everyday challenges in k-12 schools and how detached our no child left behind law from 15 years ago is from reality today. teachers are spending less time teaching, more time administering high stakes tests or teaching to the test. students are spending less time
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learning. . as a result, they have less time focusing on real skills to be ready for college or to be ready for careers in technical education after high school. unfortunately, schools across my district and the country have been experiencing the same frustrations as the teachers d students at rocky mountain high that i visited with. it imposed a one-size-fits-all accountability system, a flawed one at that, on a diverse set of states and districts across our country. that's why i'm so excited to be here on the floor of the house with the opportunity to speak about the new conference report, the new bipartisan, bicameral esea re-authorization, the every student skeds act, which passed
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in our conference committee. i ask my colleagues to join me and the other conferees in replacing no child left behind with every student skeds act. the every student skeds act is the result of years of work. former ranking member and former chair george miller, buck ranking member and mckeon, and the now chair and ranking member have worked years to put together something that republicans and democrats could feel good about. we both care about kids and education. it's not a part san issue. let's put all the good ideas on the table and they were and they were voiced. and we're able to improve deeply on the highly flawed first version of this bill that house passed which would have taken federal dollars away from the poorest schools and given it to wealthier schools.
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the house-passed schools would have failed students with disabilities by allowing unlimited students to have no accountability by classifying them with students with disabilities for alternative assessment, sweeping under the rug that -- the improvement that students made. and the first bill didn't establish any accountability for graduation or proficient rates or any parameters for interventions to ensure we can improve struggling schools. now, when the students succeed act finally passed the house it barely passed. it passed in a purely partisan manner. no democrats didn't support the bill and many republicans didn't support the bill. now, the silver lining of that is allowed the process to move forward and i have to say after months of hard work by the staff and the chairman and the ranking member, the conference committee succeeded in reporting out a bill that i believe is better than the senate bill, better than the house bill and certainly better than no child left behind.
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when the conferees met, several members offered thoughtful amendments that built upon and improved the conference framework even more. mr. messer offered an amendment that would allow funds to be used to educate teachers about best practices for student data privacy and. and i have an amendment for english language lerner, something near and dear to my heart, as founder of the charter school network. and the conference turned it into a robust bill that replaces no child left behind with a system that works better for students, for educators, for families, for schools. when esea was first passed in 1965, first and foremost, it was seen properly as a critical piece of civil rights legislation. for the first time the federal government was making a commitment that every child, regardless of race, background, zip code deserved a great education to prepare them for success and any re-authorization of esea needs to uphold that same commitment
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to civil rights that was established in 1965 and while the every student succeed act isn't perfect, i believe that it upholds that commitment to civil rights that is such an important role for the federal government to play. most importantly, the every student succeed act includes strong accountability provisions that ensure that underimproving schools are identified and improved. now, title 1 in every student succeed has come a long way from the original house bill. the number of members in the house and including those in the new democratic coalition and the tricaucus demanded stronger accountability provisions in the conference report. i am very happy to see that conference report has delivered. specifically, the every student succeed act maintains annual statewide assessments which gives states, districts, teachers and parents valuable information about how students are performing and the tools they need to improve student performance. this data will be broken down by subgroup, by race, by socioeconomic status to ensure
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no students are swept under the rug. and this bill includes a clear framework for identifying consistently low-performing schools and provides resources and ensures that states intervene to improve them. it fully maintains our promise to parents of students with disabilities, the promise that schools will be accountable to ensure that their child are learning and the unique learning needs of their children are met. to be clear, these requirements are not the same top-down one-size-fits-all accountability provisions of no child left behind. the one-size-fits-all formula of adequate yearly progress is rightfully gone. the accountability provisions in every student succeed acts has a framework for states as they create their own meaningful accountability plans. that means states can be flexible to create specific policies for them. it's a challenge for states to rise to the occasion and meet the learning needs of all students while maintaining
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those federal rails to ensure that no child is left out. it this bill provides additional flexibility around testing by allowing high-quality federally recognized tests to also meet the annual test requirements in high school. in my district, high schoolers take the colorado state test, the a.c.t. and if necessary a.p. or i.b. exams. that's a lot of testing in the final years of high school. this new flexibility would mean that appending -- pending application that the colorado says would be specifically allowed in statute under this bill, andry couldn't be more proud of that provision. this bill also maintains strong support for high quality charter schools, something that i made a hallmark of my time here in congress and have been a co-author of bills that have passed this body overwhelmingly. that charter school language is reflected in this bill. the language would improve charter school access and service for all students. give new and i owe vative charter schools the tools they need to meet their goals to serving at-risk and diverse
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students and ensure limited federal investment supports the replication and expansion of high-quality, innovative charter schools. i founded two public charter school networks. the freedom to innovate and the exibility to pursue unique education can help charter schools succeed at the different levels. the investment in innovation program has been one of my top priorities. in colorado, the -- one received a $3.6 million innovation grant to expand programs for at-risk schools in seven schools and because of that grant, they were able to extend the school year at four elementary school years, target math schools and implement the stem academy at skyline high school. i couldn't be more proud of this provision. this rule has a corporate welfare giveaway to the oil and gas industry. thankfully they are two
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separate votes. -- so they can vote for -- against that and for the kids. want to think my colleagues should vote no on the rule. they stuck another bill in there that's an enormous multibillion dollar giveaway to the most profitable industry on the face of the planet trying to preserve the fossil fuel industry rather than find a pathway forward to transition towards a lower carbon emission future. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from colorado reserves. the gentleman from texas. mr. burgess: mr. speaker, at this time i'd like to recognize and yield three minutes to the gentlelady from north carolina, a valuable senior member of the committee on education and labor. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from north carolina is recognized for three minutes. ms. foxx: thank you, mr. chairman. i thank my colleague, dr. burgess, for yielding time. my family's home didn't have electricity or running water. my parents while dedicated and
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hard working were poor with little formal education. fortunately i was pushed by the right people, teachers and administrators, wouldn't let me settle than anything than my best. i learned firsthand the power of education and the vital role and the success of individual americans. unfortunately, today's k-12 education system is failing our students. decades of washington's counterproductive mandates and the no chifled left behind law have resulted in stagnant student achievement, disappointing graduation rates and high school graduates entering college and the work force without the knowledge and resource they need to succeed. parents and education leaders have lost much of their decisionmaking authority to washington bureaucrats and the secretary of education has bullied states into adopting the obama administration's pet policies. the rule we're debating now would provide for consideration of a conference committee agreement, the every student skeds act, re-authorizing and reforming the elementary and secondary education act that
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would allow congress to finally replace the no child left behind. as a grandmother, educator and former school board member, i know students are best served when teachers, parents and administrators are the driving force behind improving education. this agreement does just that by reducing the federal footprint in the nation's classrooms and restoring control to the people who know their students best. the compromised every student succeedsct gets washington out of the business of running schools. it protects states and local economis by prohibiting the secretary of education from coercing states into adopting common core, punishing them for abandoning it. it would replace unprecedented -- place unprecedented restrictio on the secretary allowing thefrom to do so through executive fiat as this administration has done repeatedly for the past three years.
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and the accountability system s done more to tie up districts than to support local efforts to support children. it also reduces the size of the education bureaucracy by eliminating ineffective and dupe i will tiff federal -- duplicative federal programs. if congress were to fail to act, states would be force to choose between the fundamentally flawed policies of no child left behind which doubles down on federal programs, mandates and spending. the obama administration's controversial temporary conditional waiver scheme which has imposed the administration's preferred policies and heighten the level of uncertainty shared by states and school districts. america's students deserve better. the -- that's why i'm so pleased this agreement gives states a better chance to succeed by getting washington out of their way. our work has been validated by "the wall street journal" which states the bill would represent the largest evolution of
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control to the states than a quarter century. it is far better than the status quo. by reversing no child left behind, the micro management of classrooms -- 15 seconds. mr. burgess: i yield 15 seconds. ms. foxx: congress is giving parents, teachers and local education leaders tools they need to repair a broken education system and help children reach their full potential. it's time to get washington out of the way and i encourage my colleagues to support this rule and the underlying conference committee agreement, the every student succeeds act. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. the gentleman from colorado. mr. polis: thank you, mr. speaker. i'd like to yield 2 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from massachusetts, a member of the energy and commerce committee, mr. kennedy. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. kendkend thank you very much, mr. speaker. i -- mr. kennedy: thank you very much, mr. speaker. i'd like to thank my colleague for yielding and for all the work he's put in on an important and necessary advancement in our education system. as he mentioned, the rule we are debating today also incorporates a rule for an energy bill that i wanted to address today because nowhere
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is the need for a comprehensive energy policy more critical than in my home state of massachusetts and the entire region of new england. with recent announced closures of two plants in our region, one coal and one nuclear, we are facing loss of over 2,000 megawatts of an already antiquated, already overtaxed electric grid. that loss of capacity is already causing the bills of our consumers to skyrocket through a quadrupling from over $1 billion to $4 billion. the closures and subsequent rate increases underscores our need for a road map that puts us on a path toward renewable energy while balancing reliability and affordability. the bill before us today does exactly the opposite. it reverses course and renews our investment in outdated energy resources while putting up roadblocks that would halt the innovation of our energy infrastructure which we so desperately need. i'm very concerned with section
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1110 of the bill which would require regional grid operators to conduct a reliability analysis each time a rate change it is filed at the federal energy regulatory commission. unfortunately, reliability comes at a cost and the analysis required by section 1110 fails to even consider its impact on ratepayers, ignores the concerns i hear across my district across every single day. rate increases means families can't save, businesses can't grow, local towns can't plan for the future. that's why i introduced an amendment which would simply add at the lowest possible cost to the reliability analysis in section 110 -- 1110. unfortunately it was not made in order. it would have given much needed flexibility to determine what its reliability needs are and how much it is going to cost local ratepayers. the reliability analysis is a clear benefit to fuel types that can be stored and ignores the realities and benefits of other sources of energy,
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including renewables. the criteria fails to consider original disparities such as natural gas resources, local policies and infrastructure. the majority is going to insist on our reliability analysis at the very least we should consider the impact the analysis would have an our energy costs to our constituents. to say i'm disappointed about what this bill has become would be a tremendous understatement. i hope today's vote will send a signal to the majority that this version does not have a viable pathway forward and our caucus remains committed to working with them on a bill that does. thank you very much. i yield back. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from texas. mr. burgess: i'm pleased to recognize the gentleman from alabama for four minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for four minutes. >> i thank the gentleman for yielding. mr. speaker, as a former member of the alabama state school board, former chancellor of post-secondary education for the state of alabama and as a member of the education and work force
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committee, i'm proud to support this rule and the underlying legislation. for too long, our nation's education system has failed under a heavy, top-down system of mandates and requirements set by washington bureaucrats and special interest groups. the every student succeeds act changes that by getting washington out of the way and empowering our local teachers, principals and administrators. mr. byrne: this legislation achieves these goals by reducing the federal government's role in k-12 education and restoring control over education back to the states and local school districts where it belongs. "the wall street journal" edtorial board call this is legislation the largest deaf lution of control to the states in a quarter century -- the devolution of control to the states in a quarter century. reduces noted that it
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-- increases state control. this bill prohibits the secretary of education from enflunesing or coercing states into adopting common core this bill makes clear it is solely a state's responsibility to set academic standards and pick assessments. these restrictions on the federal sec retear of education are unprecedented and will end the secretary's ability to influence education policy through executive fiat and conditional waivers. some may wonder what the alternative is to this legislation, so let me tell you. without this bill, we will continue to allow the obama administration and the federal government to dictate education policy to the states. without this bill, the secretary of education will continue to use federal grants and money to coerce states into adopting certain academic standards like common core.
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without this bill, the federal department of education will continue to operate more than 80 programs which are ineffective, duplicative and unnecessary. without this bill, teachers will continue to have their hands tied by policies and assessments before bureaucrats in washington, d.c. washington has no business telling our states and local school districts how to december run their schools. so let's pass the every student succeeds act. let's get washington out of the way and let's empower our local teachers, parents, and students. i urge my colleagues to support this rule and support the every student succeeds act and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentleman from colorado. mr. polis: i'd like to yield 2 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from new jersey, mr. pascrell. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. pascrell: i have a great deal of respect for the ranking member's intellect and integrity
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as well as the chairman and working us through this rule. but, but, it is simply disgraceful that while the president of the united states, our president, was in paris this week to unite the world against the growing threat of climate change this house chose to take up this particular legislation that would undermine the transition to cleaner power sources. these irresponsible bills put the american people at risk by exposing them to the dangers of carbon pollution. further exacerbating the negative empacts of climate change and putting our natural resources in jeopardy. while some of my friends chose to deny solid scientific evidence, more than 12,000
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peer-reviewed scientific studies are in agreement. climate change is real. and humans are largely responsible. by releasing large amounts of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere from burning fossil fuels to produce energy. but this is the most embarrassing part. for our country that this house is ignoring the scientific and national security community which has long recognized the national security threat climate change poses for future generations. the longer term consequences of failing to act to address climate change may further -- make further -- may further instability in regions already teetering on the edge of crisis. access ld impair future
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to food and water and increase competition and tension between countries vying for limited resources. now as this body chooses to ignore our military leaders, we are faced with a choice. we can reject the continued calls for fossil fuels from the ground or we could put our heads in the sand and pretend everything is fine. hunky dory. i may not be a scientist or a military expert, i don't think it is difficult to walk and chew gum at the same time. we can listen to the experts by investing our time and efforts in both short-term and long-term policies to keep the public safe. with that, i thank you and i yield back the remainder of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from texas. mr. burgess: at this time i'd like to recognize the gentleman from tennessee, mr. duncan, for three minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for
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three minutes. mr. duncan: i rise in support of this rule and in spoth of both bill this is rule will bring to the floor. i thank the gentleman from texas for yielding me this time. i find myself in very strong agreement with him on every point that he raised in his outstanding opening statement. in regard to the energy efficiency bill, mr. speaker, unemployment is a serious problem in this country but we have much more underemployment. we have ended up with the best educated waiters and waitresses in the world, as many thousands of college graduates can't find good jobs. our environmental rules and regulations and red tape have caused several million good jobs to go to other countries other the last 40 or 50 years. we need more good jobs in this country, mr. speaker, and this energy bill will help produce this movement of jobs to other countries. mr. speaker, i rise primarily today to speak in favor of the student success legislation. in 2001, i was one of just 45
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members of the house who voted against the no child left behind federal education law. just 10 of those 45 remain in the house today. republican congressman sam johnson, walter jones, joe pitts, dana rohrabacher, jim sensenbrenner, pete sessions and myself and democrats john conyers, bobby scott and maxine waters. this turned out to be one of the most popular votes i ever cast, especially with teachers. i have spoken well over 1,000 times in schools through the years and i voted against the bill in 2001 because i felt the teachers, principals and parents in east tennessee had enough common sense and intelligence to run their own schools and classrooms and didn't need washington bureaucrats telling them what to do the no child left behind law was a great overreaction to failed schools in some of our nation's biggest cities and it needs to be replaced. today i rise in support of the every student succeeds act so we can leave behind the no child left behind law. "the wall street journal" -- as
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a previous speaker mentioned, "the wall street journal" published an editorial calling this new bill, quote a bipartisan compromise that would be, quote, the largest devolution of federal control in a quarter severagethrism paper pointed out that it's far better than the status quo which would continue if nothing passes and described the bill as, quote, a rare opportunity for real reform. this bill should please many conservatives because it does away with the common core mandate this legislation is an example of great work by my own senator, constituent and friend, senator lamar alexander. this bill is just one of many reasons why senator alexander is one of the most respected members of the other body and i commend him for his efforts to improve our nation's schools. and i urge all of my colleagues to support these two bills that this rule brings to the floor and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from colorado. mr. polis: i yield three minutes to the gentleman from vermont,
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mr. welch. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. welch: i thank the gentleman. this bill is missing a great opportunity where we have common ground on energy efficiency. mr. upton, mr. whit our great chairmen of the subcommittee and the standing committee made an honest effort to try to include all of the possible things we could do on energy efficiency but we came up short. the american council for energy efficiency economy, that's made up of a lot of private sector companies trying to meet the demand that their consumers, corporate consumers and individuals have, to get more bang for their energy dollar by using less an saving more, have said that this bill will not reduce energy consumption in the united states, it will increase it. at a cost of about $20 billion through 2040. why are we doing that? energy efficiency is the area we
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agree, there's a lot of debate, contentious debate about climate change, we're not going to resolve that today. we have bipartisan agreement that we should use less energy, it's good for our customers and it's good for the economy and it's good for the environment. we came up short. many of the costs in energy efficiency could be saved with building codes language which mr. mckinley engineer on the republican side, introduced along with me. that's not in this bill. there was a number of other bipartisan amendments that could have been offered. one by mr. kinzinger, the smart building acceleration act, should be in the bill. one by mr. reid, the smart manufacturing leadership act, should be in the bill. so energy efficiency, that's the place we can work together and it's the place where we save money by using less energy and improving our economy and improving the environment as well. the second area is the renewable fume standards.
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we have a huge debate in this congress. if you're a corn farmer, from that district, renewable fuel standards works for you because it increases what you get for producing corn. everywhere else, we're getting hammered. the cost of -- cost to farmers that have to pay grain bills is higher. the cost to consumers who have to buy fooneds is higher. the cost of small engine owners who have to get more repairs is higher. it's bad for the vimet. that's been determined, i think, to be a well intended flop. many of us had amendments that were going to let this congress vote on the renewable fuel standards. it was denied by the rules committee because the congressional budget office has said that if we actually passed an amendment eliminating the renewable fuel standards, drivers of pickup trucks and cars would get higher gas mileage and therefore there would be less revenue in the transportation bill from gas tax and we might have to pay more to farmers as a subsidy. now, what's going on here when we can't take a vote on a
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proposal that would have the effect of saving driving public money? on gases? i'm willing to take that vote. i'm willing to take the heat for saving drivers in this country money because they can get better mileage without ethanol in the fuel. mr. speaker, there's been a real effort here on the committee to make progress. my goal is that we keep at it and try improve this bill as it goes along the path of the legislative path. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from texas. mr. burgess: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentleman from colorado. mr. polis: i yield three minutes to the gentleman from ohio, mr. ryan. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. ryan: i thank the gentleman and rise in opposition to the rule but would like to speak on some of the positive benefits i see in the education portion of this bill coming down the pike later on today. first and foremost, i think we're learning a lot, mr.
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speaker, about what it really means to prepare young kids for an education today. and i believe the brain science that is unfolding in our country and around the world is helping us better understand exactly how young minds work and how our own brains work. i think it's smart for us to send more power back to the local districts and then support programming that can help kids learn better. and a component of this bill, the student support and academic enrichment grant program, allows through helping to educate well-rounded kids, focusing on well-rounded education, focusing on safe and healthy schools, gives local school districts an opportunity to invest in programs like the social and emotional learning programs that are going on around this country. it's an interesting study a metaanalysis about 213 programs,
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270,000 kids who are participating in social and emotional learning programs saw an 11 percentile point increase in test scores. that closes the achievement gap. we've seen a 10% increase in pro social behavior a 10% decrease in anti-social demavor a 20% swing in the behavior of the kids. we have a mindup program that goldie hawn started. in warren county schools, we saw the emotional learning program. in one of our schools we saw a 60% reduction in out-of-school suspension. 60% reduction. and these programs are having significant benefits. if you look at the qualities that a young person needs, i believe this bill helps us get back to redefining what the common core is. and in my estimation, the
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common core is, are we teaching kids mental discipline, the ability to be aware, the ability to be focused, the ability to cultivate one of the key components to a successful life and that's the ability to regulate your own emotional state? this comes well before science, technology, engineering and math. teaching these key fundamental characteristics, mental discipline, physical discipline, focus, concentration, self-regulation, key components before you even get to the academic side of things. the other component in here is creating healthy schools. this gets into the school lunches. this gets into the food that these kids eat. if the kid is not getting, if the student is not getting healthy foods, they are not going to be able to concentrate. they are not going to be able to have a high energy level or do well ack deck imally. to me -- academically.
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to me, the healthy foods, the healthy environment -- i thank the gentleman. those are the building blocks before we even get to the academic component of what happens in the classroom. so i want to thank the committees and the conference committee for putting this all together. and just recognize that i believe there is a new way of educating our kids emerging here. there is a new common core developing and that's the mental, discipline and the physical health of our young people. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from ohio yields back. the gentleman from colorado reserves. the gentleman from texas. mr. burgess: mr. speaker, can i inquire from the gentleman from colorado how many additional speakers he has? mr. polis: i'm prepared to close. mr. burgess: and i'd be prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from colorado. mr. polis: i'd like to yield myself the balance of my time. mr. speaker, if we defeat the previous question, i'll offer bring up a
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amendment that would close the loophole that would bar the firearms and explosives to those on the terrorist watch list. mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to insert the text of the amendment in the record along with extraneous material immediately prior to the vote on the previous question. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. polis: thank you. mr. speaker, we have before us today an education bill that is a vast improvement over the status quo. i'm proud to say it's the result of the work product between democrats and republicans working together to finally replace an outdated educational law with one that akes a lot more sense. it maintains the original goal of esea from 1965 that is to protect the civil rights of all americans, to ensure that no school district can sweep under the rug or deny a quality education to any student because of their ethnicity or
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race or income status and it allows states and districts the flexibility to meet those needs. it allows states and districts the flexibility to do something but not the flexibility to do nothing. and that's the fine line that democrats and republicans have worked together to seek and have accomplished with this bill. beginning in 2011, the department of education embarked on an unprecedented process of granting annual esea waivers to states and some districts. now, you've heard that waiver process blasted from the other side. absent that waiver process, under the formula of adequate yearly progress, every state and district or nearly every state and district would have been labeled a failure. so i hope that my colleagues are grateful for a waiver process that has succeeded in granting waivers, not only to my home state of colorado, but to most states and districts across the country. now, of course, the waiver process opened up a pandora's box and we can all agree it gave too much power to a single federal agency, not knowing who
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the next president is going to be, that's something that republicans and democrats are concerned about. while president obama and secretary duncan's use of the waiver process allowed states to get out from under a flawed law, we can't necessarily count on the next president to be as generous with the waiver process and no child left behind, which is why it's completely appropriate and why you see so many democrats and republicans and educators and school board members lining up to say, you know what, we need better statutory guidance and we need to eliminate the one flawed federal measurement of adequate yearly progress and replace it with an accountability system that works at the state and district level and maintains the federal commitment to civil rights for all students. no, i personally agree with some of the reforms that resulted from the esea waivers but a complex waiver process is at the whim of whoever the
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chief executive is at the time is not sound policy to improve our schools. i'm proud is a that i this bill, esea, has brought support from a diverse coalition of stakeholders. it has support from superintendents, teachers, the chamber of commerce, the business roundtable, the national center tore learning disabilities, third way, the stem education coalition, the national governors association and many others who are very well regarded or organizations that support the bill. and just over the past few days, i heard from constituents who support the every student succeeds act. i spent most of my public career in education. i believe that education is the single most powerful tool for creating opportunity, for ending poverty, for lifting people into the middle class and beyond. i served as chairman of the state board of education of colorado. i founded two charter schools. i served as superintendent of a
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charter school, the new america school. and during my time in congress, i've sat on the house education and work force committee, and on a perble note, i have a preschool-aged son. nothing could be more important for the future of our country than improving our public schools. education is important to me just as it is important to thousands of families in my district and parents everywhere. the every student succeeds act is a good bill that will move our education system forward. i'm proud to support the conference report, though, again, i'm opposed to the rule and h.r. 8, the corporate welfare for the oil and gas industry bill, which was unfortunately put under the same rule as an education bill that i think many of us can agree on. i want to talk about some of the specific language around charter schools that i worked hard to include in this bill. i'm proud to say that this version of the bill maintains strong federal support for new and innovative charter schools as well as allowing for the
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replication and expansion of public charter school models that we know work for at-risk kids. it's one of the great things about education. for every challenge we face, for every problem we see in public education we also see an example of what works. a great teacher in a classroom defying the odds by helping at-risk students achieve. a great school, a great principal, a great site leader who has turned around a low-performing school, improved graduation rates, got kids more to college, this has worked around the country. boulder valley schools, districts across the country there's examples of what works and what doesn't work. the truth is that the federal government and states need to ensure that districts change what doesn't work. and one of the best ways to do that is to take proven models of success and expand and
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replicate them. one of those models that can work are public charter schools . i'm proud to say that public charter schools have been embraced in my home state of colorado. denver public schools, which serves a high percentage of at-risk kids, has over 20% of their children choosing to attend public charter schools. our state also enjoys strong school choice across public schools and even between districts. this bill improves upon the charter school language by allowing the grants to be used for expanding and replicating successful models and uping the bar on authorizing practices and ensuring that quality public charter schools are meeting the needs of learners across the country. many of these charter schools wouldn't get off the ground without these federal startup grants because they don't receive any public funds or state funds. in my home state of colorado until june of the year they open, in other states it might be a little bit different, but generally speaking, all of
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those planning costs and operating costs for that year until they open are not compensated because they have no student enrollment at that point. and believe me, it takes money to get public charter schools off the ground. they raise money from philanthropy, some school districts who want more public charter schools help them too and federal investment along with that will help ensure these great educators and great ideas have a chance to actually start a public charter school that meets a real learning need in the community. i couldn't be more proud that those priorities of the all-star act are -- the charter school bill passed overwhelmingly by this body in two different length sessions are reflected in this final bill. i encourage my colleagues to vote no and defeat the previous question, to vote no on the rule, to vote yes on the education bill, no on the corporate welfare for the oil and gas industry bill and i
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yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from colorado yields back. the gentleman from texas. mr. burgess: mr. speaker, might i inquire as to the amount of time remaining? the speaker pro tempore: 11 3/4 minutes for the gentleman from texas. mr. burgess: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. burgess: thank you, mr. speaker. today's rule provides for further consideration of two important bills affecting the future of this country, the country's energy future and the future of education. very important bills. i urge my colleagues to vote yes on the previous question, vote yes on the rule, vote yes on the underlying bills. mr. speaker, with that i yield back the balance of my time and i move the previous question on the resolution. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on ordering the previous question on the resolution. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. mr. polis: mr. speaker, on that i request the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. all those in favor of taking this vote by the yeas and nays will rise. a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered.
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members will record their votes by electronic device. pursuant to clause 8 and clause 9 of rule 20, the 15-minute vote on ordering the previous question will be followed by five-minute votes on adoption of the resolution, if ordered, and motion to instruct on h.r. 644. this is a 15-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 243. the nays 177. the previous question is ordered. the question is on adoption of the resolution. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. the resolution is adopted. mr. polis: mr. speaker, on that i request a recorded vote. the speaker pro tempore: a recorded vote is requested. those favoring a recorded vote
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will rise. a sufficient number having arisen, a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 240. the nays are 18 the resolution is adopted. witho objection the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. offered by the gentlewoman from new hampshire which the yeas and nays were ordered. the clerk will redesignate the motion. the clerk: motion to struct conferees on h.r. 644 offered by ms. cusser -- kuster of new
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hampshire. the speaker pro tempore: members will record their votes by eleronic device, this is a five-minute vote. [caponing made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatis.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 193. the nays are 232. the motion is not adopted. without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table.
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without objection, the chair appoints the following conferees on h.r. 644. the clerk: messrs. brady of texas, reichert, tiberi and ms. inda t. sanchez of california. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. members, please carry your conversations from the floor. he house will be in order. he house will be in order. for what purpose does the gentleman from minnesota, mr. kline, seek recognition?
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mr. clines: mr. speaker, pursuant to house resolution 54 it -- mr. kline: mr. speaker, pursuant to house resolution 541, i call up the conference report to re-authorize the elementary and secondary education act of 1965 and ask for its immediate consideration in the house. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: senate 1177, an act to re-authorize the elementary and secondary education act of 1965, to ensure that every child achieves. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to house resolution 542, the conference report is considered as read. the gentleman from minnesota, mr. kline, and the gentleman from virginia, mr. scott, each will control 30 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from minnesota, mr. kline. mr. kline: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and and their remarks
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include extraneous material on the conference report. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman will suspend. he house will be in order. the gentleman may resume. mr. kline: mr. speaker, again, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on the conference report to accompany s. 1177. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. kline: mr. speaker, i rise today in strong support of the conference report to accompany s. 1177, to be known as the every student succeeds act, and i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. kline: thank you, mr. speaker. after years of congressional delay and executive overreach, congress is finally replacing no child left behind, but more importantly, we are replacing the old approach to education with a new approach that will
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help every child in school receive an excellent education. for more than a decade, washington has been micro managing our classrooms. mr. speaker, the house is not in order. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is correct. the house will be in order. members, please take your conversations from the floor. the gentleman from minnesota is recognized. mr. kline: thank you, mr. speaker. federal rules now dictate how states and local communities measure student achievement, fix broken schools, spend taxpayer resources and hire and fire their teachers. no child left behind was based on good intentions, but it was also based on the flawed premise that washington knows what students need to succeed in school. and what do we have to show for it? less than half of all fourth and eighth graders are proficient in math. and reading gap separates poor from their affluent peers. children are far more likely to drop out of high school than
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earn their diploma. mr. speaker, can we have order in the house? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is correct. the house will be in order. the noise will be in order. -- the house will be in order. the gentleman may resume. mr. kline: parents, teachers, superintendent leaders have been telling us for years that the top-down approach for education is not working. yet, some still believe that more programs, more mandates and more bureaucrats will help get this right. well, those days will soon be over. today we turn the page on the failed status quo and turn over to our nation's parents and our state and local leaders the authority, flexibility and certainty they need to deliver children an excellent education. we reach this moment because replacing no child left behind has long been a leading priority for house republicans. for years we fought to improve k-12 education with three basic principles -- reducing the federal role, restoring local control and empowering parents. the final bill by the house and
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senate conference committee reflects these principles. the bill reduces the federal role in k-12 education by repealing dozens of ineffective programs. we placing unprecedented restrictions on the secretary of education, eliminating one-size-fits-all schemes around accountability and school improvement and ending the era of high stakes testing and preventing this administration and future administrations from coercing or incentivizing states to adopt common core. the bill restores local control by protecting the right of states to opt out of federal education programs and delivering new funding flexibility so taxpayer resources are better spent on local priorities. the conference agreement also returns to states and school districts the responsibility for accountability and school improvement. a set of broad parameters will help taxpayers know if their money is being well spent while ensuring state and local leaders have the authority necessary to run their schools. and the bill empowers parents by providing moms and dads with
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the information they need to hold their schools accountable. the conference agreement also strengthens school choice by reforming programs affecting charter schools and magnet schools and prevents any federal interference with our nation's private schools and homeschools. reducing the federal role, restoring local control, empowering parents, these are the principles we have fought for because these are the principles that will help give every child a shot at a quality education. now, let me be clear. this is not a perfect bill. to make progress you find common ground, but make no mistake, we compromised on the details and we did not compromise on principles. mr. speaker, the american people are tired of waiting for us to replace a flawed education law. they are tired of the federal intrusion, the conditional waivers and the federal coercion. most importantly, they are tired of seeing their kids trapped in failing schools. let's do the job we were sent here to do. let's replace no child left behind with new policies based
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on principles we believe in. for these reasons i strongly urge my colleagues to support this conference agreement and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from minnesota reserves. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. scott: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. scott: mr. speaker, i'm honored to endorse the conference report on s. 1177, the every student succeeds act. we have certainly come a long way since we were on the floor debating h.r. 5, the student success act, earlier this year. i had some objections to much that was found in h.r. 5, but thanks to the commitment to work together to try to fashion a decent bill with chairman kline and our counterparts in the senate, senator alexander and senator murray, along with many long nights from our respective staffs, we found a way to produce a conference report that balances the desire for more localized decisionmaking with the need for federal oversight to ensure equity for underserved
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students. this conference report is the embodiment of what we can do when we work together in washington, a workable compromise that does not force either side to desert core beliefs. mr. speaker, the modern federal role in elementary and secondary education began in the promise of brown v. board of education when a unanimous supreme court held in 1954 that, quote, it is doubtful that any child may reasonably be expected to succeed in life if denied the opportunity of an education and such an opportunity is a right, which is to be made available to all on equal terms. despite the brown decision, our education system has remained fundamentally unequal. that inequality is virtually guaranteed by the fact that we fund education basically by the real estate tax, guaranteeing that wealthier areas will have more funds than low-income areas. across the nation, gaps in
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equity persist. these gaps made it impossible to realize the opportunity of an education to all on equal terms because too many schools lack the basic resources necessary for success. too many schools fail children year after year. these gaps disproportionately affected the politically disconnected, those in poverty, racial minorities, students with disabilities and english language learners and this was unacceptable. so in 1965, congress addressed the inequality by passing the first elementary and secondary education act, esea, which provided federal money to address, and i quote from the original bill, the special educational needs of children of low-income families and the impact that concentrations of low-income families have on the ability of local educational facilities to support adequate educational programs. simply put, congress acknowledged that the right to an education is a civil right,
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that knows no state boundaries and that the federal government has a role to ensure that all states are fulfilling their promise for all of america's children. the current resbe ration of esea, no child left behind, has run its course. it's so broken that the administration offers 40 states waivers from its most unworkable provisions. this has created not only a great amount of uncertainty for students, parents, educators and communities but has also resulted in uneven protections for underserved students and a lack of transparency for our communities. this conference report improves on both current laws and the waivers and lives up to the promises of brown and the intent of the original esea and addresses the key challenges of no child left behind. first, the every student succeeds act maintains high standards for all children but allows states to determine those standards but in a way that requires those standards to be aligned with college
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readiness. every student succeeds act requires states to put into place the assessment, accountability and improvement policies that will close achievement gaps with locally designed, evidence-based strategies that meet the unique needs of students and schools. the conference report requires transparent reporting of data to ensure that schools are responsible, not only to the achievement of all students, but also for the equitable allocation of resources to support student learning. the conference report helps states and school districts reduce the overuse of exclusionary policies by allowing funding the -- the existing funding to be used for the youth promise plans, an issue i've been working with for many years. youth promise plans is comprehensive, evidence-based plans to help neighborhoods with significant crime and teen pregnancy and other problems and to reinvest savings generated by those plans to keep the plans working in the
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future. the conference report recognizes the importance of early learning, a priority of both red and blue states alike, by authorizing a program to assist states in approving coordination, quality improvement and access to pre-k. most -- most importantly, while many of the new systems will be created by the states, under the conference report the federal government maintains the ability to make sure that states and localities are living up to their commitments that all students are being counted and that schools are being held accountable for their achievement. this conference report in the bill that i would have written alone or any member would have written alone, for that matter, i have no doubt that this bipartisan conference report will make a positive difference in the lives of our nation's children and live up to the goal of the original esea, making an opportunity for an education available to all on equal terms. therefore, i urge my colleagues to vote yes and reserve the balance of my time.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from minnesota is recognized. mr. kline: thank you, mr. speaker. now i am very pleased to yield to the chairman of the early childhood elementary and secondary act subcommittee three minutes, the gentleman from indiana, mr. rokita. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from indiana is recognized for three minutes. mr. rokita: thank you, mr. speaker. i'd like to recognize chairman kline, especially, for the work he's done over a long period of time, seven years or so, bringing us -- bringing this house, bringing this congress to where we are today. it truly is leadership at its best. let's face it, no child left behind's high stakes testing which requires all child to be caught up to grade level within one year is simply unworkable as well-intentioned as it may have been. currently the secretary of education through waivers can run schools through executive fiat and imposing requirements on state testing standards and conditioning receipt of federal funds on adopting common core standards. it's time for a positive
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change, and that change is the every student succeeds act. this bill, as pointed out here, "the wall street journal" puts it, is the largest transfer of federal control, mr. speaker, to the states in 25 years. to the states, mr. speaker, where this authority and responsibility, frankly, belongs. this bill empowers states and ends the federally mandated unproductive high stakes testing, which is the core, which is the heart of no child left behind, which is causing all the stress that we see from our teachers, our school administrators, our parents and especially our students. . all it's producing is stress and unworkable situations. the people who best know how to test, how long to test, what to test, etc., etc. are our parents, our teachers, our voters, our taxpayers, our local school administrators. let them have this
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responsibility back. it provides flexibility so voters and taxpayers to their locally elected officials can decide for them what success looks like. it recognizes when it comes to determining academic standards, state, school administrators, and parents know what is best. it's time we put our children first so we can compete in a global, 21st century world and win again. it is time we trust parents and teachers and local education leaders more than we trust federal bureaucrats in washington, d.c. this bill is a huge step in that direction and i urge all of my colleagues, republican and democrat, to support it. thank you, mr. speaker. mr. chairman, again i thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from indiana yields back. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. scott: thank you. mr. speaker, i yield such time as she may consume to the gentlelady from ohio, ms. fudge, who is the ranking
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member of the subcommittee that reported this bill. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from ohio is recognized. ms. fudge: thank you very much. i want to thank the gentleman for yielding. i thank both the chair and ranking member for their leadership. it has been a privilege to work on this with both of you. mr. speaker, today i rise to express my strong support for the re-authorization of the elementary and secondary education act. it is long overdue. for years our nation's students, their parents, and teachers have implored congress to address the flaws in no child left behind. today we finally have a bill that addresses many of the most difficult issues. though not perfect, this bill is a significant improvement over no child left behind. education is our nation's great equalizer. education opens the doors of opportunity to all of our nation's children. and this year we commemorated the 50th anniversary of
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president johnson's signing the original esea. years ago as part of the great society legislation, we passed esea as a civil rights law that affirmed the right of every child to a quality education. it further underscored the belief that poverty should not be an obstacle to student success. the bill before us protects title 1 funding. ensures equitable allocation of resources to schools. it recognizes the importance of after school education. and maintains subgroup desegregation for data for reporting. and further, the students support an academic enrichment grant program is formula based and distributed to dollars that fill resource and opportunity gaps based on the need and population. while esea does not -- does give states and local districts more flexibility, it does not federal government
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of its responsibility to protect the civil rights of underserved students. make no mistake, the department of education maintains its authority to oversee implementation of the law and take action against states and districts that aren't honoring the civil rights legacy of the esea. it was my goal that the final bill provide equal educational opportunities for all children, regardless of race, ethnicity, income, language, or disability. i believe the every student succeeds act achieves this goal by striking a balance in the best interest of all of our nation's students. i urge my colleagues to support this legislation. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields bafpblgt the -- yields back. the gentleman from minnesota is recognized. mr. klein: thank you, mr. speaker. i'm now pleased to yield -- mr. kline: thank you, mr. speaker. i'm now pleased to yield to a member of the subcommittee, two
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minutes, to the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. thompson. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from pennsylvania is recognized for two minutes. mr. thompson: thank you. i thank chairman kleine for the opportunity to voice -- chairman kline for the opportunity to voice my support for this bill which has been a long time in the making. as a member of the house education work force committee, i can attest to this conference report being the product of many years of hard work. i'm happy to have been a conferee for the every student succeeds act which drew a bipartisan agreement provides more flexibility for our states, school districts, educators, parents, and students. the every student succeeds act will establish a more appropriate federal role in education by ending their mandated high stakes testing, limiting the power of the secretary of education to dictate cookie cutter standards, and repeals dozens of ineffective and duplicative programs. ensuring resources are delivered to where they are most effective and necessary. i'm especially grateful to the conferees for their adoption of an amendment to instruct the
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department of education to study the fairness of the current title one formula used to off set the effects of poverty upon young learners. esea celebrating its 50th anniversary was created to provide each student an equal opportunity under the law, unfortunately we are still not targeting those areas with the highest concentration of poverty. i'm hopeful that we can continue to embrace the spirit of esea and ensure we are always work ngget direction of providing greater educational tupets for all children. i want to thank nigh friend, colleague, and chairman john kline, for his leadership for accomplishing this historical education reform. i urge my colleagues to support the conference report and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. scott: mr. speaker, i'm pleased to yield two minutes to the gentleman from connecticut, mr. courtney. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from connecticut is recognized for two minutes. mr. courtney: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise in strong support of this legislation. it has been 13 long years since esea was rewritten.
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as we have heard from prior speakers, there are many problems that have been identified with no child left behind which we have heard from across the board in terms of parents, educators, administrators, in terms of the need to update and revise this legislation. we also know the american economy has changed over the last 13 years and the world economy. one of the biggest problems that employers have today is the lack of individuals with degrees in science, technology, engineering, and math. stem technology. the good news is that this bill upgrades the k through 12 system to give kids the tools that they are going to need to succeed with these jobs, which now are growing three times as fast as nonstem jobs. and the good news is it provides income twice as large as nonstem jobs. what the bill does is it creates a stem master teacher corps, provides professional development training to stem educators, greater access to federal funding to support stem programs, including partnerships with nonprofits.
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encourages alternative certification programs to allow more stem teachers to come from industry. and will retain and provide promising stem teachers with differential pay. this is what our school systems need. this is what our kids need to have the tools to succeed in the future. it is a great achievement that the chairman and the ranking member defied all the conventional wisdom to get this bill to move forward. it's almost like pope francis created some aura that you capitalized on. i mean that sincerely. this is an incredible achievement to break through the barriers that have pretented us from coming together as an institution. to really fix what in many respects is the most important issue, which is creating a future for the kids and our grandchildren. again i urge strong support of this legislation and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from minnesota is recognized. mr. klein: thank you, mr. speaker. i want to commend the gentleman from connecticut for mentioning pope francis and not mentioning lady's basketball.
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aim now pleased to yield two minutes to the chair of the health employment labor and pension subcommittee, the gentleman from tennessee, dr. roe. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee is recognized for two minutes. mr. roe: thank you, mr. speaker. i also want to thank the chairman, ranking member for doing the herculean work on this bill, every student succeeds act, and the conference report, many, many hours, many congresses could not make this happen. they did. my hat's off to them. when i go home to tennessee and talk to the teachers, students, administrators, and parents what do i hear? there's too much federal control. too many forms to fill out. we are teaching to the test. the students are frustrated. the teachers are frustrated. just go sit in front of a group of teachers and ask them, would you be a teacher again? i will promise you over half will hold up their hand and say no i wouldn't be a teacher again. that's terrible. we have to make the environment where the educators are
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enjoying what they do for the most part i think teachers have the most -- one of the most important jobs in this country. i'm a product of the public education system. 23 years. if i hadn't had great teachers, i would not have had the opportunity to be a dr. i wouldn't have had the opportunity to serve in the u.s. congress. i'm forever grateful. what do we do? look, this adequate yearly progress we are being judged on. these tests as far as our students moving along. the common core. i hear that all the time at home. we don't need a national school board telling us what to teach in our community. we heard them. both sides of the aisle heard them and said, ok. what we'll do we'll push that control back down to the local level and you decide what your curriculum. you'll be held accountable for how your student outcomes are. if you have students and minorities, we'll be able to ferret those out and improve those students' outcomes. we eliminated or aledered 49 different programs -- at-ered
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49 different programs and through a flexibility grant will be easier for administrators to run their school systems of the the main thing we want to do at the end of the day create an environment where our students have the best opportunity in the world to achieve because they are now competing on a world basis. for that reason i think this bill does it and i encourage my colleagues to vote for this. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. scott: thank you, mr. speaker. i'm pleased to yield two minutes to the gentlelady from florida, former educator herself, ms. wilson. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from florida is recognized tore two minutes -- for two minutes. ms. wilson: i stand in support of the every student succeeds act. i want to thank chairman alexander and kleine and ranking members murray and scott for their year-long work on this bill. the act is a civil rights law based on a simple yet powerful
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promise made to all american children. is a promise that no matter where you live, what you look like, or what resources you have you deserve a quality education. unfortunately no child left behind's one-size-fits-all approach derailed the fulfillment of this promise by creating an untenable environment of excessive high stakes testing that undermines educators' ability to serve their students. while not perfect, the every student succeeds act is a substantial improvement that takes us one step closer to delivering on the promise of a quality education. esea will provide schools with the resources and guidelines they need to deliver on this promise by directing resources to the children most in need and allowing school districts the flexibility to use title 4 funds in a way that best works
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for their students. as someone who has dedicated my life to dropout prevention, i'm overjoyed to see this bill includes my amendment allowing title 4 funds to be used for dropout prevention and re-entry programs. but this is just the first step for our children. it is the champion of our children's education. the teachers, the parents, the principles, and the -- principals and the mentors who will create an environment of learning. that environment will ensure that our children's hearts and minds are positively shaped by our collective wisdom, our support, and love. i want to thank the teachers and parents across our nation and especially in florida for their work and commitment. i urge my colleagues to support this conference report and stand united for a single purpose, our children. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yield back. the gentleman from minnesota. mr. kline: thank you, mr.
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speaker. i'm pleased to yield two minutes to a member of the committee, the gentleman from kentucky, mr. guthrie. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from kentucky is recognized for two minutes. mr. guthrie: thank you for yielding. mr. speaker, i rise today in support of the every student succeeds act. as the father of three children who have attended public schools, i know the importance of allowing those who know our students best to be the decisionmakers. i want to thank everybody's involved in public education or education of educating our children. my wife and i certainly appreciate those who sacrifice so much time to take care of our children. since coming to congress, i have heard from parents, teachers, school board members, and school leaders that no child left behind is not producing results our children need. states and local school districts need flexibility to deliver a quality education to our students. this agreement does just that. it gets the federal government out of our classrooms and puts the decisionmaking back in the hands of our state and local
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leaders. this agreement prevents the secretary from legislating through executive fiat. it prohibits the secretary from adding a new requirement through regulations and from adding new requirements as a condition of approval of estate plan. as a member of the house committee on education and work force, and a conferee on this agreement, i am pleased with the determination of my colleagues in this congress to move beyond failed policies of no child left behind. our children deserve a quality education and this bill is a step in the right direction. i do want too thank the chairman an ranking member and those in the senate and all the hard work i know the staff from both sides, people that we get to work with every day, who work hard the people of this country, who have worked hard for our children, i appreciate the hard work they've done in bringing this agreement to where we are today. i urge my colleagues to support this conference agreement and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from minnesota reserves. the gentleman from virginia.
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mr. scott: i'm pleased to yield one minute to the gentleman from california, mr. takano. mr. takano: as a former public schoolteacher for 24 years, i'm proud to rise in support of this bill which will improve our schools, offer more support to teachers and most importantly provide more state of the unions the education they deserve. having served in the classroom in the implementation of no child left behind, i can say without hesitation that our current education system needs a reset. while well intentioned, no child left behind created a punitive approach to education policy that punishes underperforming schools instead of helping them improve that rigid, test-driven approach combined with heavy-handed intervention from the federal government failed to close the acleevement -- achievement gaps in our country this replaces it with a more appropriate test and review approach that returns decision making to states and school districts. it will empower educators who
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best understand their students' needs to develop new ways to meet local challenges. i'm also pleased this bill increases overall education funding and makes sure states maintain their investment in schools. i might not give this bill an a-plus but it is a solid, bipartisan compromise and an overdue replacement for a status quo we know is unacceptable. for that reason i i give it a passing fwrade. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from minnesota. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i now would like to yield to another member of the committee, two minutes to the gentleman from indiana, mr. messer. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. messer: thank you, mr. chairman. mr. chairman -- mr. speaker, i have not heard from one parent, student, or teacher who likes no child left behind. despite what may have been the best of intentions, it's one size -- its one size fits all mandates led to federal
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government micromanagement in the classroom, over tested kids, and anxiety-ridden teachers. sadly, no significant improvement in student outcomes. that's why virtually everyone wants to repeal no child left behind. today, we have an opportunity to do just that. by supporting the every child succeeds act. it's a new approach to the federal role in education and if you read it, there's a lot to like in the bill. by voting for this bill, we can end federal common core mandates and stop the march toward a federal curriculum. we can end high stakes testing and abolish the unworkable adequate yearly progress metrics. power all, we can give
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over education back to the people we trust. the parents, the teachers, and he the local school administrators who are best positioned to make good decisions for our kids. access to a quality education is the gateway to opportunity in modern america. we still have a long way to go before we can make sure every child has that kind of access. but the every child succeeds act is a big step in the right direction. i urge my colleagues for their support and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from minnesota reserves. the gentleman from virginia. mr. scott: thank you, mr. speaker. i'm pleased to yield three minutes to the gentleman from maryland, the democratic whip, mr. hoyer. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. hoyer: i thank mr. scott for
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yielding, i want to thank mr. kline, the chairman of the committee and ranking member scott for their work on this bill. mr. speaker, frederick douglass was born a slay on the eastern shore of maryland. he became one of the -- slave on the eastern shore of maryland. he became one of the great leaders of our country. obviously worked hard with abraham lincoln to see the issuing of the emancipation proclamation he said this. it is easier to build strong children than it is to repair broken men. this bill is about investment in the future, investment in future. investing in elementary and secondary education is one of the most consequential acts we will undertake in this house. in fact, our investments in education will be felt long after we are gong. and it will have a significant bearing on the future well being of our economy and our democracy.
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i want to thank chairman cline and ranking member scott as well as senators lamar alexander and patty murray, the chair and ranking member of the senate health committee for their extraordinary efforts on this bill. this is a bipartisan bill. e worked together. frankly, we have a little trouble working together here, but they worked together there and then we worked together here. it's turning out well. my friend indicated that he would not give the bill an a-plus. i was trying to reflect on any bill i've ever voted on that i would give an a-plus to. it's not a perfect bill. but it represents a reasonable compromise that will strengthen elementary and secondary education in this country, provide certainty going forward and help prepare the next generation of students, no matter who they are, how they
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learn, or where they live. theirccess in college, in careers and vocations, and as innovators and entrepreneurs in our economy. i'm particularly proud, and i thank mr. scott and i thank also the two senate leaders, as well as mr. kline, but this -- that this conference report includes the full service community schools program which i have championed for several years. my wife, judy, was an early childhood educator and administrator in prince georges county, she died over 18 years ago. it is from her that i first learned of the potential for full service community schools. our state has very successfully created a network of schools using these integrated approach named in her memory. there will be 52 judy centers around our state for 3 and 4-year-olds. some of them are privately
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funded, they are so popular. some publicly funded. and some in partnership. these judy centers enable low income families with very young children to access a range of critical services all in one place. when starting kindergarten, children whose families participate in judy center programs perform better than those whose families did not. may i have one additional minute? mr. scott: i yield the gentleman 30 seconds. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for 3 seconds. mr. hoyer: judy's centers are helping to close that gap. in closing, i urge my colleagues to vote for this bill. because it is a step forward. it is an indication as well that we can work in a bipartisan fashion for the benefit of the people we represent. soy urge my colleagues to vote for this conference report and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from minnesota. mr. kline: thank you, mr. speaker.
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i'd like to yield a minute and a half to a member of the committee, the gentleman from florida, mr. curbelo. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for a minute and a half. mr. curbelo: mr. speaker, i rise today in strong support of the every student succeeds act and i want to thank my colleagues on the education and work force committee for their tireless efforts to improve k through 12 education for all students, especially chairman kline, chairman rokita and ranking members scott and fudge. throughout this process, we've identified the successes and failures of no child left behind. this agreement allows us to capture the spirit of that last efta re-authorization, that education is the great civil rights issue of our time, that every child in this country can learn, no matter the color of their skin, the zip code they live in, the language their parents speak, or their income level. we also learned from the failures of no child left behind that led to an overly rigid one
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size fits all accountability system inevitably giving the federal government an outsized role in public education. that is why the legislation before us today returns decision making authority to states and local school districts, empowering communities and giving america's teachers the respect they deserve. i'm especially pleased that the bill we are considering today includes my amendment which will ensure that children learning english are counted without being counted out. and that the teachers and schools who serve them are given more time to help these students succeed. as a former member of the miami-dade county school board i'm proud to have been part of this process as a a conferee and i urge my colleagues to vote in favor of this bipartisan compromise. this agreement promotes school choice, empowers local leaders, and most importantly, puts children, not washington bureaucrats, at the center of america's education system. with that, i yield back.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from minnesota reserves. the gentleman from virginia. mr. scott: could you advise how much time is available on both sides. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia has 13 1/2 minutes. and 14 1/2 for the gentleman from minnesota. mr. scott: thank you. mr. speaker i'm pleased to yield two minutes to the gentlewoman from oregon, ms. bonamici. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized for two minutes. ms. bonamici: thank you, mr. speaker. the students, educators, parents and school board members i have spoken with over the years have been waiting for this day. i'm glad we're finally reaching agreement on a new education law and we're going to leave behind no child left behind. it was ale well-intentioned law. its goal was to create more equitable education for children across the country. it resulted in too much emphasis on one size fits all mandates and intervention and the adequate yearly progress requirement caused too much focus on high stakes testing. change is long overdue. the every student succeeds act
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returns flexibility to states and school districts to design interventions that address the specific needs of their schools and importantly, it has states use multiple measures of academic progress in their accountability system so no schools will be punished for the performance of students on a single exam. they can focus on addressing resource inequality and improving school climate and delivering access to advance coursework and rich curricula. after hearing frequent concerns from students and teachers for fewer, better assessments, i'm pleased that the every student succeeds act includes a bipartisan suggestion i offered with representative costello about stem education and music and art and design. a well-rounded curriculum that teaches our students to think creatively is good for our students and good they are future economy. the every student succeeds act
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has states set high standards for students. it requires states and school districts to intervene in schools where students have poor academic outcome and where subgroups of students like english learners and others lag behind their peers. this is true to the original elementary and secondary education act and its goal to closing achievement gaps and promoting equitable opportunities for students. i commend chairman kline and chairman alexander and ranking members scott an murray and their hardworking staff for this bipartisan accomplishment. i support the every student succeeds act and urge my colleagues to do the same. thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from minnesota. mr. scott: thank you, mr. speaker. -- the gentleman from minnesota. mr. kline: thank you, mr. speaker. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia. mr. scott: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from wisconsin,
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mr. pocan. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. pocan: i thank the gentleman for yielding and thank him and chairman kline for their hard work on this bill. i rise in support of the every student succeeds act. defending public else is one of the reasons i came to congress. for years we witnessed the negative impact on education from underfunding our schools to stripping teachers of their rights to collectively bargain for fair pay and conditions like in my home state of wisconsin. at the same time, punitive policies which limit teachers' and administrators' abilities to handle their classrooms has made their job difficult. it's time to renew the promise of a system that has student's best interests at heart. i meet with teachers regularly and was stunned when i was told that one third of the school's staff turned over last year because schools lack the financial support and autonomy they need to give students the
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educational experience they deserve. teachers are being asked to do more with less and it's coming at the expense of our kids' education. while this bill is not perfect, i am pleased that we are finally discussing a bill today that aims to put students first and trusts our teachers who dedicate their careers to education. this bill trusts and empowers teachers to ensure their voices are heard on the federal, state, and local level while increasing teacher quality and professional development and reducing the burden of testing in schools. these are good improvements, mr. speaker, good for our nation's children and that's why i support this bill. i yield my time back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from minnesota. mr. kline: thank you, mr. speaker. i'd like to yield a minute and a half to another member of the committee, the gentleman from michigan, mr. bishop. . mr. bishop: thank you, mr.
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speaker. i too would like to voice my appreciation for chairman kline, ranking members, for their hard work on this legislation. i'm a father of three children in k-12 education in my hometown. and i think all of us would agree here that we have a moral obligation to ensure the best possible educational environment for our children. unfortunately, however, the past 25 years have seen student achievement go down. we can blame that on a lot of things. there is plenty of blame to go around. but the best question we can ask today is, what is congress going to do about it? the answer, i believe, begins with the every student succeeds act. it's a bipartisan bill that helps to limit the role of federal bureaucrats, restore local control and empower parents. the "wall street journal" has called in the largest shift of federal control to the states in a quarter century. and they are precisely correct. it gives more flexibility back
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to local school districts, and it gives states the right to set their own standards, so if a state wants out of common core, they'd have the option to do that. what's more, parents can get information on local school performance, so they can do what's best for their children. and when it comes to holding schools accountable, states and local leaders will get that responsibility back as they should. but above all, this bill replaces the no child left behind act. i think we can all agree that that current system, our current system, is broken. so let's make a difference here oday and -- thank you. let's make a difference here today and adopt the smart public policy and do it for our children. make sure that they have an excellent education. with that i urge my colleagues to vote yes on the every student succeeds act and i yield back. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from minnesota
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reserves. the gentleman from virginia. mr. scott: thank you, mr. speaker. i'm pleased to yield two minutes to the gentlewoman from massachusetts, ms. clark. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from massachusetts is recognizesed for two minutes. ms. clark: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank you for proving that congress can listen to our educators, administrators and our communities and put the needs of our students first. we all know that a great country deserves great schools. and i am pleased to join champions of education in both chambers, on both sides of the aisle, in supporting this blueprint for schools. that invites every child to participate, no matter a child's income, race, zip code or disability. this bill helps fulfill the unrealized promise of no child left behind by protecting resources for schools in underserved communities. it provides accountability and
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a quality of access -- and equality of access, while reducing reliance on high stakes tests. and it creates opportunities for our most vulnerable students, homeless and foster youth, students who have suffered abuse, and those who have experienced trauma. for the first time we have a bill that invests in early learning through preschool development grants. this legislation brings us closer to ensuring that every child gets a fair shot at their dream. i thank my colleagues for their work and commitment to our country's children and to our economic future. thank you, mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from minnesota reserves. the gentleman from virginia. mr. scott: thank you, mr. speaker. i'm pleased to yield two minutes to the gentlelady from north carolina, ms. adams. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized for two minutes.
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ms. adams: thank you. i thank the gentleman from virginia for yielding. the elementary and secondary education act of 1965 played a major role in ensuring that all students have access to quality education. because of this legislation, over the past 50 years we've made remarkable progress in closing the achievement gap that plagues many low-income students. however, we still have a lot of work to do. the last re-authorization, no child left behind, was signed into law in 2002 and hasn't been updated since. in that time we've seen many changes in our education system and the needs of our students and educators. in addition to the unintended consequences of no child left behind, so i'm proud that today we're finally moving forward with a bipartisan bill that keeps the best interests of american students and educators in mind. the every student succeeds act is a true embodiment of a what -- of what a stronger re-authorized education -- elementary and secondary
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education act should look like. this education upholds the key principles of equal access to education for all. rich or poor. and it upholds accountability system stms that ensure -- systems that ensure access to success. from promoting access through early education, to supporting our neediest students and our teachers and investing in stem education, this legislation puts our students first and it helps to close achievement gaps. our children are our future. and educating them shouldn't be a democrat or republican issue. so i urge all of my colleagues to support our students by supporting this critical, bipartisan legislation. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from minnesota. mr. kline: thank you, mr. speaker. i now would like to yield to another member of the committee, two minutes to the gentleman from georgia, mr. allen. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is recognized for two minutes. mr. allen: i thank you, mr. chairman. and i do appreciate your hard work on this bill, as well as
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our ranking member, mr. scott. thank you for getting us to this important day and today i rise in support of every student succeeds act. this bicameral legislation improves k-12 education by repealing no child left behind, and scales back washington's role in education. by restoring authority to those who know our students the best. as we have seen, the current top-down approach is not working. the arms of washington have extended far too long into the classroom. we need a change. american students deserve a change and the every student succeeds act is a powerful step forward in reforming our educational system. this legislation stops federal micromanagement of local schools, gets rid of unnecessary programs, downsizes the federal education bureaucracy, places new restrictions on the authority of the secretary of education, and most importantly, restores
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control back to the local level, letting states and school districts address the needs of our students. teachers, school officials and parents have an ear to the ground each day. they know what our schoolchildren need to succeed. and this is what i hear every time i am in the district. washington bureaucrats do not belong in the classroom. i am proud to support this legislation that gives students the tools they need for a successful future. i urge my colleagues to vote yes on the conference report and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from minnesota reserves. the gentleman from virginia. mr. scott: thank you, mr. speaker. can you again remind us how much time is remaining on both sides? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia has seven minutes. the gentleman from minnesota has 11 1/2 minutes remaining. mr. scott: thank you. mr. speaker, i'm pleased to yield two minutes to the gentleman from california, mr. -- to the gentleman from california. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized for two minutes.
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mr. desaulnier: thank you for yielding. i want to say what a pleasure it is to be here to support the every student succeeds act. having spent much of my first year in the district going to school districts and schools, and having to be able to go back in t coming weeks and say we have this bipartisan compromise through the hard work of chairman kline and ranking member scott and chairman alexander and ranking member murray. so for them, i congratulate them and thank them for their hard work. i'm also pleased to see that a number of priorities that i share with my democratic and republican colleagues were included in the final version of the landmark bill. the conference report for every student succeeds act sets national education standards that ensure all american students, regardless of geography, socioeconomic status, race or gender, receive a quality education. included in the bill are several measures that i'm proud to have worked on with colleagues. some of these measures, or all of them are meant to promote, to protect all students. a number of them, such as
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promoting efficien fectsive head start programs -- effective head start programs, m pleased were included. protecting student athletes from concussions and providing studes with academic and extra curricular support beyond the normal school day, which we know are important with a concussion -- important. with the concussion relationed provisns of the bill, these are important first steps, although they do not go far enougho combat the devastating physical and neurological impacts of brain injuries like those sustained that we recently heard about by hall of fame football player frank gifford. there's a demonstrated need for increased vigilance and imoved education on ts important topic. i look forward to working with my colleague on this and other issues. again, i want to thank the chairman and the ranking memb and i urge all my colleagues to support this very important ece of legislation. thank you, mr. speaker i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from minnesota reserves. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. scott: mr. speaker, i yield one minute to the gentleman from colorado, . polis. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from colorado is
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recognized for one minute. mr. polis: thank you, m. speaker. when esea wasirst signed in 1965, it was critical piece of civil rights legislation. in fact, when predent lindsen johnson signed the bill -- lyndon johnson signed the bill, he said, it bridges the gap between hlplessness and hope for millions of students affected by i the bill befe us today maintains psident johnson's commitment to the achievement of every child, regardsless of race, socioeconomic background, zip code. any of my colleagues have talked about the new flexibility provided in the bill. well, you know what, that's true but it's flexibility to meet the learning needs of every kid, not the flexibility to fail. flexibility does not mean freedom from responsibility. states are accountable for the achievement of each and every child under this bill and i'm confident the president wouldn't sign any bill that doesn't maintain strong civil rights protections, and i would never support a bill that would allow students to be swept under the rug. this bill upholds the spirit of the original elementary and secondary education act. i'm proud to support it today.
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and support innovative solutions to improve the opportunities of -- for learning that every child in our country has. and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from minnesota. the gentleman from minnesota reserves. the gentleman from virginia. mr. scott: thank you. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. scott: mr. speaker, a lot has been said about the work being done in this committee. i think it's important to point out that the chair and myself didn't do all this work. his staff, senator murray's staff, senator alexander's staff, worked hard. and i'd like just to read the names of some of the members of my staff that worked on this legislation. starting with denise and brian christian, helen, erica, austin and
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others. also it's rarely noticed that the health legislative council's staff, ana, susan, and brendan, worked hard on this legislation, as did congressional research service staff, becky and jodi. i'd like to mention those names , as hardworking mens -- members that have brought about all of this bipartisan cooperation. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from minnesota. reserves. the gentleman from virginia. mr. scott: mr. speaker, at this time i'd yield one minute to the distinguished leader, democratic leader, ms. pelosi. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized for one minute. ms. pelosi: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank the gentleman for yielding. i thank him for his extraordinary leadership, as the new ranking member on the education and work force committee. bringing with him all of his
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commitment to education in our country. as well as his knowledge of the connection of young people to to justice system and provide opportunity for them in the safest possible way. thank you, mr. scott, for your great leadership. we're all very, very proud of you. i know mr. george miller would be as well, your predecessor in this role. and i thank you, chairman kline, for your leadership as well. for enabling this bipartisan legislation to come to the floor. i absolute chairman -- salute the chairman and ranking member in the senate as well. 50 years ago our nation took a bold and historic step forward for educational opportunity, for the strength of our economy and for the heaflt our democrat sifment -- health of our democracy. which is based on an informed electric rate, enacting the --
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electorate.t -- at the bill's signing in 1965, president lyndon b. johnson, himself a former teacher, explained, no law have i signed or will ever sign means more to the future of america. as president johnson added, education is the only valid passport from poverty. in addition to what it returns to the individual and enables that person to reach his or her aspirations, education brings much to our economy. in fact, nothing brings more to the treasury of our country than investments in education.
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from early childhood education, k through 12, which we are addressing today, higher education, post secondary education, lifetime learning. indeed, the esea's commitment to expanding education access, especially to our most vulnerable students, has proven essential to bridging the gap between poverty and possibility for generations of americans. for the first time in our nation's history, more than half of the students attending public school live in poverty. to close the opportunity gap, we must close the education gap that limits the future of so many children and communities. today, we are thankful to be passing a bipartisan agreement that will strengthen the education of all of our children. it helps states to improve low-performing schools and
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empowers teachers and administrators with better training and support. it targets funding to the most at-risk and needy students with enhanced title 1 investment. it provides vital resources for english language learners and homeless youth. gives us what we've always wanted, school as a place where students can learn, teachers can teach and parents can participate. it replaces high stakes testing and state and local -- with -- let me repeat it. it replaces high stakes testing with state and local district flexibility. we are bolstering our commitment to strong stem, arts, and early education for children in every zip code. and our -- in our area and other parts of the country we scall stem, steam, science technology
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-- science, technology, engineering, art, and math. all of that reinforced in this legislation. with these improvements in the esea authorization before us, it's no wonder that this agreement is supported by far-ranging coalition including the u.s. chamber of commerce, the business round table, the national governors' association, the leadership conference of civil and human rights, a.s.t. and n.e.a., two teachers unions, the national center for learning disabilities, and many more. we all agree that education is a national security issue. president eisenhower taught us that. it is also an economic issue. it is one of the most pressing civil rights issues of our time. with this legislation, we can help ensure that access to high quality education is the right of every student. i urge my colleagues to join in
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passing this strong bipartisan re-authorization of the historic ese; a, the every student succeeds act. once again, i thank the distinguished chairman, mr. kline, and our ranking member, of whom we're very, very proud as well, mr. scott. with that, mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back this gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from minnesota. mr. kline: i'm prepared to close, we've had our last speaker. i'll let mr. scott speak and then close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from virginia. mr. scott: i yield myself the balance of the time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. scott: as has been pointed out this bill does not include everything everybody wanted but the civil rights and education communities both support the legislation because of the significant civil rights implications in the bill. this will go a long way in making education an equal
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opportunity, giving equal opportunity in education and i would like to swro deuce for the record, i ask unanimous consent that a long list of education and civil rights organizations who have endorsed the bill be entered into the record. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. scott: mr. speaker, i want to thank the chair for his cooperation and hard work and urge our members to support the bill and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from minnesota. mr. kline: thank you, mr. speaker. i want to start by thanking my colleagues on the committee in the house and in the senate, particularly the ranking member, mr. scott, senators alexander and murray, and their staffs. we would absolutely not be here today without their hard work. today is a big day. we have an important opportunity to approve a bill that will replace no child left behind with new policies that reduce the federal role, restore local
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control and empower parents. it will help every child in every school receive a quality education. this effort began in earnest almost five years ago. february 10, 2011. when the education work force committee held its first hearing under the new republican majority to examine the challenges and opportunities facing k-12 classrooms. since that first hearing we have heard dozens of hearing and spent many hour os on the floor debating competing ideas for education. all those ideas are reflected in the final bill we have today. behind all of that hard work was a team of dedicated staff. they put in long hours and sacrificed a great deal to draft the house and senate proposals, move them through our respective committees and chambers, and got to work developing this bipartisan, bicameral bill we're discussing today. our friend and colleague, the ranking member mr. scott, talked about members of his staff and what a fantastic job they've
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done and i know from many reports that they put in an awful lot of hours. in fact, mr. speaker, this process has been under way for so long that some staff who started this journey with us have now moved on to other endeavors. former staffers, including james bergeron, alex, heather curry, dan short, angela shapiro and former staff director barry karr. and then there are those who are with us today. i wish i had time to elect nice everybody but i've got a few minutes and -- time to recognize everybody but aye got a few minutes and i'm going to recognize some of them. republican staff members, aaron, laura, katherine, leslie, brian. of course i'd like to recognize the republican staff director julie ann sullivan who leads the team with patience, skill, and
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determination. amy jones who was a firm and fair negotiator throughout the entire process. and last but certainly not least, our senior education policy advisor brad thomas, sitting here patiently beside me today. according to our most recent estimates brad has spent more than of straight days here at the office working out the details of the final bill. we could not have done it without his knowledge, expertise and education. brad, we are grateful for your service. again, because of the hard work of both republican and democrat staff on the education work force committee as well as the staff of senators murray and alexander, we will soon have a new education law that helps every child in every school receive an excellent education. i would remind all my colleagues that when we come in to vote later this amp, it's a buynary chiss. -- binary choice. you can vote for this new direction, give our children a better opportunity, or you can vote to keep no child left behind, the law of the land.
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it's an either-or choice. i urge my colleagues to vote yes on the conference report to accompany s. 1177 and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. all time for debate has expired. pursuant to house resolution 542, the previous question is ordered. the question is on adoption of the conference report. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair the ayes have it. the conference report is adopted. mr. kline: i request a recorded vote. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman ask for the yeas and nays? mr. kline: i do the speaker pro tempore: those favoring a vote by the yeas and nays will rise. a sufficient number having risen, the yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on this uestion will be postponed. for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i send to the desk a privileged report from the committee on rules for
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filing under the rule. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title. the clerk: report to accompany house resolution 546, resolution providing for consideration of the conference report to accompany the bill h.r. 22 to authorize aid for federal highways, highway safety programs and transit programs, and for other purpose. the speaker pro tempore: referred to the house calendar and ordered printed. for what purpose -- for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition?
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>> mr. speaker, i would ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on the bill h.r. 8. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to house resolution 542 and rule 18, the chair declare the house in the committee of the whole house on the state of the union for the further consideration of h.r. 8. will the gentleman from illinois, mr. dold, kindly take the chair. the chair: the house is in the committee of the whole house on the state of the union for further consideration of h.r. 8 which the clerk will report by title. the clerk: a bill to modernize energy infrastructure, bolster america's energy security and diplomacy and promote energy
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efficiency and government accountability and for other purposes. the chair: when the committee of the whole rose on tuesday, december 1, 2015, all time for general debate pursuant to house resolution 539 had expired. pursuant to house resolution 542, no further general debate shall be in order. in lieu of the amendment in the nature of a substitute recommended by the committee on energy and commerce printed in the bill, it shall be in order to consider as an original bill for the purpose of amendment under the five-minute rule and an amendment in the nature of a substitute consisting of the text of the rules committee print 114-36. that amendment in the nature of a substitute shall be considered as read. no amendment to that amendment in the nature of a substitute shall be in order except those printed in house report 114-359. each such amendment may be offered only in the order printed in the report, by a member designated in the report, shall be considered as read, shall be debatable for the time
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specified in the report equally divided and controlled by the proponent and an opponent and shall be -- shall not be subject to amendment. and shall not be subject to a demand for division of the uestion. it is now in order to consider amendment number 1 printed in house report 114-359. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? mr. upton: i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 1 printed in house report 114-359, offered by mr. upton of michigan. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 54 , the gentleman from michigan, mr. upton, and a member opposed each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from michigan. mr. upton: mr. chairman, i would ask -- i yield myself such time as i might consume. the chair: the gentleman is recognized.
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mr. upton: mr. chairman, this amendment strikes a number of provisions, some of which have already been enacted into law and makes technical and conforming changes to the reported text of h.r. 8, h.r. 2295, and h.r. 2358. so the overall bill i would say, h.r. 8 is a broad bipartisan bill, seeks to maximize america's energy potential, seeks to update and modernize outdated policies rooted in an era of energy scarcity to reflect today's era of energy abundance. i think this is a good amendment and i would reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from illinois. >> i rise in opposition to the ealt. the chair: the gentleman is ecognized. >> i yield myself such time as i may consume. the chair: the gentleman is ecognized.
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mr. rush: mr. chairman, how in the world did we get to this point? how did we get to this place, the republican party bringing forth this highly partisan, backwards looking, does more harm than good so-called energy and all r all the time the effort that was put forth by both sides to come up with a ipartisan compromise. mr. speaker, after working together for the majority of this year, literally moments before the energy and commerce committee was set to mark up the rug was pulled from under the minority side. d the republicans turned its
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collective back on the legislative compromise. we were informed that the majority had reneged on its prior commitments and what was an ially supposed to be infrastructure bill will contain no actual funding for any infrastructure projects. not one cent. addition to reneging on a compromise to fund a grid modernization program that would have benefited low income consumers, the majority has also stripped the one provision of the bill that received widespread praise and support
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from both sides of the aisle. the 21st century work force title that my office had authored has been stripped from this awful excuse of a comprehensive energy bill. all of the care and support that my republican colleagues professed to have for helping minority women and veterans find good paying energy jobs and careers has somehow not only dissipated but has totally disappeared. it would appear, mr. speaker, that due to the apathy and indifference of a few highly privileged elitists from the heritage foundation, helping to
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improve the polite of millions of dis-- plight of millions of disadvantaged americans who have been historically underserved and underemployed within the energy sector is now considered to be, to use their very words, wasteful, ineffective and inefficient. so, we are left, mr. speaker, with this. what aspects of this bill can we take back to our constituents, what aspects of this bill can we tell our constituents with a straight face that will help them improve their lives? all this bill does, mr. speaker, is attempt to strip away oversight and roll back
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regular lyings in order to help -- regulations in order to help industry game the system and increase its profits at the expense of the american people. mr. speaker, this bill is a sham and it will actually take the nation's energy policies backwards, all the way back, mr. speaker, the 21st century work force amendment would represent a win for industry, a win for our communities and a win for americans all. deleting this very provision that was unanimously approved in committee speaks vols about the majority's commitment to my -- vols about the majority's commitment to minorities, women and veterans. this bill, h.r. 8, leaves women behind, it leaves minorities
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behind, it leaves veterans behind, it leaves low-income communities behind, and it leaves america behind. mr. speaker, for this reason i oppose the bill. the chair: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from michigan. mr. upton: mr. chairman, i would yield back the balance of my time and ask for a favorable vote on the amendment. the chair: the gentleman yields back. the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from michigan. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. mr. rush: mr. speaker, i ask for a roll call vote. the chair: pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from michigan will be postponed. it is now in order to consider amendment number 2 printed in part house report 114-359. for what purpose does the gentleman from new york seek recognition? mr. tonko: mr. chair, i have an
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amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 2 printed in house report 114-359 offered by mr. tonko of new york. the chair: pursuant to husband resolution 542, the gentleman from new york, mr. tonko, and a member opposed each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from new york. mr. tonko: thank you, mr. chairman. my amendment simply strikes section 1101 of the underlying bill. the section is a solution in search of a problem. the section's purported goal is to reinforce federal energy regulatory commission's role as the lead agency for citing inter-- siting interstate and natural gas pipelines. i don't think there's any doubt over ferk's role in pipeline approval. in reality, this section is designed to further expedite permitting for natural gas pipelines. but there's very little evidence that this process needs expediting. which ultimately would restrict states and other federal agencies' ability to review projects and the public's ability to comment on them. the g.a.o. looked at the
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approval process for pipelines by ferc and found 95% are approved within two years. when it takes longer, it is because the project is large or controversial due to taking a private -- of private property, traversing state or federal land, or requiring placement of compression stations and other operation equipment in an area close to existing infrastructure or communities. even the industry agrees that pipeline approvals are happening. in october, pipelines digest, an industry publication, wrote, through april 30 of this year ferc certified and placed in serve almost twice as many natural gas projects and more than doubled the miles of pipeline that were put in service and certified through the same date in 2014. we're building new pipelines, there's no problem that needs fixing, so what evidence is there that the certification process needs to be further titled in favor -- tilted in favor of pipeline companies at the expense of environmental
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review and public comment? i would say there isn't any. and yet this section would require ferc to decide on a pipeline application within 90 days after the commission issues its final environmental document, regardless of the complexity of the application. it would also allow ferc to consider environmental data collected by aerial or other remote surveys instead of onsite inspections. this would enable pipeline companies to circumvent property owners' rights when surveying land, all in hopes of speeding up projects. the sites of natural gas pipelines is complicated and can be controversial. i know this well since there are a number of projects currently being developed in or near the district that i represent. i hear from my constituents about these projects regularly. they are very concerned and they feel like they are being left out of this process. they are concerned about the safety and about the noise, air and water pollution from the construction and operation of the pipelines' associated facilities. the pine pipeline companies do
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not have a problem, the public does. we know these types of project, no matter how beneficial to the public interest, can be controversial. someone is always unhappy about the selected route or placement of these facilities. but we need to do a better job of bringing the public along. these provisions do the opposite. the public has a right to be part of large projects that impact their communities. does that take extra time? yes. is it less convenient for the company? yes. but these pipelines will be in service for many decades. if it is worth doing, it is worth doing right. so i see no reason why we should be expediting projects if we cannot be sure they can be built in a safe and environmentally friendly manner. we need to ensure federal and state regulators are given the time needed to carefully review applications for the construction of natural gas pipelines and to ensure that the landowners and the general public have the ability to participate meaningfully in the siting process. this section undermines that process. i urge support of the amendment
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and i would yield the remaining time to the gentlewoman from new jersey, representative watson coleman, for a brief statement. mrs. watson coleman: thank you. i thank the gentleman from new york for yielding to me. mr. speaker, i rise in strong support of the tonko amendment and strongly urge its adoption. section 1101 of this misguided energy bill includes a critical provision that i'd like to highlight. this language would allow big energy companies to use aerial and remote surveying to sur-- circumvent key ferc environmental reviews. this troubling provision flies in the face of the rights of local governments and even private landowners to make decisions about the use of their own property. this provision allows big energy to bypass more comprehensive and appropriate on the ground surveys to assess the environmental impacts of energy infrastructure. mr. speaker, there is one such project that new jerseyans know all too well. the pennies pipeline.
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it is a proposed 108-mile natural gas pipeline that would run from pennsylvania across the delaware river and terminate in hopewell township in my district. if built, this pipeline would threaten some of the most environmentally sensitive areas in the delaware river basin. virtually every local government along the route has officially lodged their opposition or disapproval, concerned citizens have packed meetings to make their voices heard to stop this pipeline. there are diverse communities across two states represented by members of congress on both sides of the aisle. areas i represent like mercer county and hopewell and scores of private property owners have exercised their right to deny access to their property, to carry out the surveys. mr. speaker, my constituents did not send me to congress to fight for the -- to fight -- they sent me to congress to fight for the environment and to stand up against ill-conceived projects such as this one. thank you very much. i yield back the balance of my
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time. the chair: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? mr. upton: would ask for time in opposition to the amendment. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. upton: mr. chairman, i oppose this amendment. section 1101 makes important improvements to ferc's process for reviewing interstate natural gas pipelines. as we all know, the demands for natural gas is growing, which requires new and modernized pipeline infrastructure, it's got to what unfortunately the permitting process -- it's got to happen. unfortunately the permitting process has become increasingly complex and challenging. rate hikes hit the families an businesses that can least afford it, the most vulnerable. we've worked very dill gently to find some agreement on this provision. we've held hearings, received technical assistance from ferc, and accepted many of their recommendations. this section, section 1101, would authorize concurrent permitting reviews, require more transparency through the process, and allow for the use of new survey technology for
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siting pipelines. yesterday, just yesterday in a hearing before the house energy and commerce committee, ferc chairman bay acknowledged the need for new pipeline capacity and signaled his support for the enhanced transparency provisions and the regulatory dashboard that is required by section 1101. so this amendment would strike, if passed, it would strike a commonsense approach to introduce greater public transparency and accountability for federal and state permitting agencies, and therefore i would ask for a no vote on the amendment and yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from new york. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the noes have it. the amendment is not agreed. to mr. tonko: i ask for a recorded vote, please. the chair: pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, further proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from new york will be postponed.
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it is now in order to consider amendment number 3 printed in house report 114-359. for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? mr. peters: i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 3 printed in house report 114-359 offered by mr. peters of california. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 542, the gentleman from california, mr. peters, and a member opposed each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california. mr. peters: thank you, mr. chairman. my amendment to the north american energy security and infrastructure act will directly enhance reliable energy security when our communities are most vulnerable, during natural disasters. my amendment simply adds energy storage as a form of energy that the department of energy should consider to improve emergency preparedness.
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the bill in its current form only addresses the need to have resilient oil and natural gas infrastructure, which we certainly should all support. energy storage encompasses technologies capable of storing previously generated electric energy and releasing that energy at a later time. it can include various types of batteries, exasser tos, fuel cells and more, and has the potential to improve electric power grids, enable growth in renewable electricity generation, and provide alternatives to oil-based fuels in the nation's transportation sector. . a 100-fold increase. and natural disasters are becoming more and more common. over the last four years, the government has spent $136 billion for relief from hurricanes, wildfires and other weather-related events. every dollar we invest, we save
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$4, not to mention the lives that can be saved. building up community resiliency will save lives and save money. in san diego our utilities are testing and developing energy renewable accommodate energy. our school districts are adding large-scale battery storage to their campuses that goes beyond the guidelines to save money. and our companies and universities including u.s.c.d. are part of cal-charge. ensuring that we are better to withstand weather events is just common sense. including energy storage is a
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smart forward-thinking step to equip communities with the tools they need. i ask my colleagues to support the amendment. and i reserve. the chair: for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? mr. upton: i would seek five minutes in opposition. though i support the amendment and i think it's a good amendment, it includes energy storage as a form of form of energy that d.o.e. should consider during natural disasters and improves the bill and i complyment the gentleman. and i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from california. mr. peters: i appreciate your consideration of my amendment and i yield back. the chair: the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from california. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it and the amendment is agreed to. it is now in order to consider
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amendment number 4 printed in house report 114-359. for what purpose does the gentleman from arizona seek recognition? >> i have an amendment at the desk. the clerk: house report 114-359 offered by mr. franks of arizona. the chair: the gentleman from arizona and a member opposed each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from arizona, mr. franks. mr. franks: i want first to thank the chairman of the rules committee, mr. sessions for making this amendment in order. and i want to sincerely thank the chairman of the energy and commerce committee, mr. upton for his support of the amendment and also just for the entire effort on his part and other committees of jurisdiction to move this underlying and critically important bill forward. mr. chairman, our national security and the reliblet of our electric grid are related.
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without the grid, telecommunications no longer operates. transportation of every kind is profoundly affected. sewage and water treatment facilities stop and safe and continuous food supply is interrupted. society is not structured. nor does it have the means to provide for the needs of nearly 300 million americans without electricity. the current strategy for recovery from a failure of the electric grid leaves us ill prepared to respond significantly to a significant manmade or naturally occurring event that would potentially result to vast numbers of the critical electric grid components. nearly at the same time or over an unprecedented geographic scale. mr. chairman, the negative impacts on u.s. electric infrastructure are potentially
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catastrophic unless practical steps are taken to provide protection for critical elements of the electric system. nearly a dozen studies including those by d.o.d., d.o.e., the army war college, the national academy of sciences and the bipartisan electromagnetic pulse commission have all come to the same conclusion. the united states' power grid is vulnerable to severe space weather and electromagnetic pulse. we have now spent billions of dollars hardening our defense assets against electromagnetic pulse. there is a civilian grid within the continental states for 99% of their electricity needs without which they cannot effect the mission. some of america's most enlightened national security experts and our enemies
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considered a pulse attack against america to be a quote, chill shot against america. it is astonishing that our grid remains unprotected against severe e.m.p. and for it to remain so is an open invitation to exploit this dangerous vulnerability. my amendment eaments section 215 by creating a protocol for cooperation between industry and government in the development, promulgation and implementation of standards and processes that are necessary to address the current shortcomings and vulnerabilities of the electric grid. this will base bill does, indeed, provide for such protocols for the protection of the grid, but only in quote, grid security emergencies defined in the bill of the actual occurrence of an event and only after a president
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issues a directive declaring such an emergency and that is akin to having a parachute that opens on impact sm the nature of this threat is if there is a true emergency, it may be too late to respond. my amendment is critical because it encourages cooperation on a solution to our vulnerability before it is deemed an emergency. mr. chairman, timely, i would say that we live in a time where the vulnerabilities to our electric grid and our most critical infrastructure are big enough to be seen and still small enough to be addressed. and this is our moment. and i would appeal to my colleagues to support this vital amendment to protect americans and our national security from this dangerous threat and i thank the chairman. mr. upton: i agree with what you have to say, electromagnetic pulse really do pose a threat to the amendment. i think your amendment is
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constructive and moves the bill forward. i have a few small concerns and i intend to vote for it. i thank the gentleman. frampings franks i thank the chairman more than i know how to say and i yield back. the chair: does the gentleman yield back his time? fraverages franks i do. the chair: the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from arizona -- i'm sorry, the gentleman from illinois is recognized. mr. rush: i rise to claim time in opposition, though i won't oppose the amendment. the chair: without objection. the gentleman is recognized. mr. rush: mr. speaker, this amendment aims to address the threat of electromagnetic pulses and geomagnetic storms on the system's electric grid. while i agree we should protect our nation's electric grid, i don't agree we should only focus these high-impact
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low-frequency events. there are many other threats, mr. speaker, to the grid that deserves just as much focus. the franks' amendment may undermine current authority and n the process for developing technical standards for grid security already in place under federal law. mr. speaker, i want to thank you. and i yield back. the chair: the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from arizona, mr. franks. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. he amendment is agreed to. it is now in order to consider order to consider amendment number 5 for what purpose does the gentleman from maine seek recognition?
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mr. poliquin: i have an amendment at the desk. the clerk: amendment number 5 printed in house report 115 offered by mr. poliquin of maine. the chair: the gentleman from maine, mr. poliquin and a member opposed, each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from maine. mr. poliquin: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the great state of maine is blessed with natural resources. we have 3,000 miles of breath taking coastline and healthy fisheries and have an abundance of waterways, lakes, streams and ponds and abundance of water as a result. we have potatoes and broccoli in our farming communities and our landscape is dotted with small organic farms and as importantly, maine is right in the country's wood basket.
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mr. chair, when you cut a strand of trees, one can leave behind the branches and the bark for that matter to decompose and become part of the carbon cycle. or that bark and branches and chips can be collected and transported to paper mills, to burn energy or to burn to create paper or can be trucked to power plants to produce electricity. when this happens, it is the same carbon footprint as the biomass decays on the forest floor or if it is burned in a paper mill or electric generating station and with the same carbon footprint. this creates jobs for loggers and truckers and also we help fuel our state economy and our nation's economy by using this
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renewable green abundant, safe, home-grown biomass. many states have shifted away from foreign importation of oil for all kinds of reasons, not the least of which is national security. and today, throughout our country using more natural gas and oil developed here in our country, in america, also nuclear power, hydro and biomass. today, mr. chair, federal regulations allow electric utilities to determine the reliability of these sources of fuel they are burning to create electricity. now, part of that reliability equation is the length of a contract to deliver that fuel source to the power plant. now, if the reliability of that fuel source is not up to snuff,
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then that fuel source would result in electricity generated by that power plant not having full access to the power grid and not being able to sell its product, electricity, to the economy. now, some source of fuel like coal, for example, mr. chair, is usually sold in two or three-year contracts and the reason for that is today coal is used to generate electricity. however biomass is different. we can use branches and wood chips and bark and biomass that includes other organic materials. to create pellets that are burnt in wood stoves or create mulch or plywood and other materials. as a result, mr. chair, biomass, as a fuel source, is usually sold in one-year increments.
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where is bill, h.r. 8, i'm offering an amendment to, is a small technical amendment, but a very important one, because what it does, is it puts all fuel sources on a level playing field. able to compete in the market, such that biomass, a green renewable environmentally friendly, home-grown source of fuel for our electric generators is not penalized. this is good for the economy. it's good for job creation and strengthens our national security because it diversifies the fuel sources that we need to fuel and power our electric generators that are used in creating jobs and creating products throughout our country. as a result, mr. chair, i ask everybody in this chamber, republicans and democrats today
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to support this commonsense amendment to help our state, to help our country, to help our economy and to help our families have better lives. mr. upton: i want to say to my colleagues, this amendment clarifies that electric plants an be helping. so i think that it's a good amendment. we are willing to accept it and thank the gentleman. mr. poliquin: i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey seek recognition? mr. pallone: address the house -- yield myself such time as i may consume. the chair: does the gentleman claim time in opposition? mr. pallone: the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. pallone: the gentleman's amendment is further speaks physicianity, one of the three requirements that defines reliable generation.
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the amendment to the public too ty regulatory act is prescriptive. the amendment is under the federal power act in section 1110 and to purpa and section 11107 is an amendment to micro manage. i'm not certain what the impact of the amendment would be other than to ensure that no electric generation facility need to enter into a contract with a fuel supplier that is longer than one year. there is a problem in new england but i doubt this is the best way to address those problems. i yield back. . the chair: the amendment is agreed to. it is now in order to consider amendment number 6 printed in house report 114-359. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek
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recognition? mr. veasey: mr. chairman, i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 6 printed in house report 114-359 texas. by mr. veasey of the chair: the gentleman from texas and a member opposed will each control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas. mr. veasey: mr. speaker. my amendment requires the department of energy to submit a report to explore the potential effects that commercial utilization of ccs's have on our g.d.p. g.d.p. it would also examine what these technologies that contribute to our efforts to reach our greenhouse gas emission goals. my amendment is intended to supplement the c.c.s. evaluation report required by the underlying legislation and i'm confident that this study's indings would provide concrete
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evidence that it will meet our nation's energy needs. c.c.s. is a combination of technologies that allows industries to capture carbon or co-2 emissions for transport or storage before they are emitted into the atmosphere. these technologies have the potential to allow for the continued use of industry as well as decreasing the amount of co-2 released into the environment. america's energy -- recent energy's boom has shown us that fossil fuels will continue to make up a sizeable portion of our nation's energy portfolio. so as we continue to pursue an all-of-the-above energy policy, we must be sure we use these resources in an environmentally -- in an environmentally responsible fashion. carbon capture technologies do achieve that goal. that is evidence in the wide range of support it receives from industry as well as environmental groups. however, though much is understood about the various
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aspects of c.c. ccus, commercial or large-scale deployment has not been achieved and that's for a variety of different reasons. the absence of commercial projects has led to a fractured understanding of its widespread economic and environmental benefits, and it is important for us to understand the potential economic benefits ccus can hold for consumers and stakeholders if we continue to urge the department of energy to increase its investments in research and development of these technologies. the results of the study would also provide industry stakeholders and likely investors with concrete data to make those economic decisions. and finally, as america continues to participate in the global effort to address climate change, we must also understand what ccus can contribute to our emission reduction goals. and by considering long-term climate mitigation needs, the studies could provide reason for the department of energy to continue to support ccus
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technologies even if a d.o.e.-supported project does not immediately succeed. and these technologies have a variety of possible applications from oil recovery and so on. it's time we really understand how large-scale deployment of this technology would benefit our country. i urge my colleagues to support this amendment, and i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan rise? mr. upton: mr. chairman, i request time in opposition of the amendment. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. upton: but i support the amendment. this amendment requires the department of energy to submit a report to congress on the potential effects commercial utilization of casualon capture and sequestration could have on the economy, energy infrastructure and greenhouse gas emission goals. we support the amendment and i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back his time. the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from texas. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. the amendment is agreed to.
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it is now in order to consider amendment number 7 printed in house report 114-359. for what purpose does the gentleman from west virginia seek recognition? mr. mckinley: mr. chairman, involve. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 7 printed in house report 114-359 offered by mr. mckinley of west virginia. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 542, the gentleman from west virginia, mr. mckinley, and a member opposed, each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from west virginia. mr. mckinley: thank you, mr. chairman. i rise in support of this amendment, but before proceeding, i, again, want to applaud the work of chairman upton and his staff of bringing this crucial bill, energy bill before us and bringing it to this floor. so i want to thank you for that. but this amendment directs the department of energy and the department of commerce to conduct a study on the feasibility of establishing one or moreth ain storage and distory -- more ethane storage
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and distribution hub in the united states. it would show the effects it would have on our national security. the -- shale formations has increased dramatically over the last 15 years, and ethane is the largest component of that shale gas. most of the ethane production is used in the petrochemical sector, a major component in the feedstock manufacturing. while ethane storage continues to grorks the lack of storage inhibits america's manufacturing economy. establishing ethane storage and distribution hubs could bring a new market for these stranded liquids and allow them to achieve their full potential as critical national energy assets. a revamped storage and distribution infrastructure will make our economy less vulnerable to potential unanticipated disruptions and
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reduce transportation costs. the result of this study, furthermore, -- the results of this study and decentralation of the ethane activity could encourage investment in manufacturing and the expansion of petrochemical industry all across america. therefore, i urge my colleagues to support this amendment for a study and thank you, and i reserve the balance of my time. mr. upton: if the gentleman will yield? mr. mckinley: yes. mr. upton: i would just say this amendment is a good amendment. it directs the secretary of energy and the secretary of commerce, in consultation with other relevant agencies and stakeholders, to conduct a study on the feasibility of establishing an ethane storage and distribution hub in the u.s. you and i talked about it over the last number of months. it's a good amendment. it helps add to the bill and we support the amendment. mr. mckinley: thank you, mr. chairman. the chair: the gentleman reserves his time. does anybody claim time in opposition? the gentleman from west virginia is recognized.
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mr. mckinley: i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back his time. the question son the amendment offered by the gentleman from west virginia. those in favor say aye. -- the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from west virginia. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. he amendment is agreed to. it is now in order to consider amendment number 8 printed in ouse report 114-359. for what purpose does the gentlelady from north carolina seek recognition? mrs. ellmers: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today in support of this bipartisan -- the chair: will the gentlelady suspend? does the gentlelady have an amendment at the desk? mrs. ellmers: yes. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 8 printed in house report 114-359 offered by mrs. ellmers of north carolina. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 542, the gentlelady
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from north carolina, mrs. ellmers, and a member opposed, each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentlelady from mac. mrs. ellmers: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in support of this bipartisan amendment and join my colleague, congressman jerry mcnerney of california. mr. speaker, together we share the grid innovation caucus with the belief that we need to have a bold, ambitious vision for modernizing our nation's electric grid. our current electric infrastructure resembles that of the original grid built over 100 years ago. new technology has given us the opportunity to transform a 20th century grid into a 21st century grid, and my home state of north carolina is helping to lead the way. in fact, north carolina is the second leading state in grid innovation technology development behind california. there is a need to bring our electric grid and the entire electric system up to date in order to meet the changing demands of our digital economy.
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this amendment is simply a statement of policy and blueprint for what we want our future grid to consist of and how we want it to perform. by adopting this amendment, we begin to develop a concrete plan to further secure our grid. this is a conversation that needs to happen now and this energy package moves the debate forward. technology has given us the ability to further secure our grid from physical and cyberthreats as well as increase the efficiency, reliability and redundancy of this vital component. i urge my colleagues to vote yes on this amendment, and with that, mr. speaker, i'd like to yield three minutes to my colleague from california, jerry mcnerney. the chair: the gentleman from california is recognized for three minutes. mr. mcnerney: thank you. i want to thank my colleague from north carolina for yielding and for her work on the grid innovation caucus, which is one example of bipartisan cooperation for the good of the nation. i also join my colleague, mrs.
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ellmers, in offering this bipartisan amendment which would establish a statement on grid modernization policy. this will establish a clear vision to achieve a future grid. the grid is the core of our nation's effort to transition to clean energy sources. that said, our current electric grid has much the same technology that was in place for the last 100 years. we need to improve and upgrade the dwrid to meet the 21st century demands and -- grid to meet the 21st century demands and it must be reliable, secure, resilient and affordable while integrating a range of resources and devices including intermittent renewable energy storage and electric vehicles. having a national grid modernization policy or vision will help achieve these objectives while maintaining a secure, safe, reliable and affordable power to which our nation is known.
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i want to thank my colleague on the grid innovation caucus co-chair and urge a yes vote on the amendment and i yield back. the chair: for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? mr. upton: i would ask for the time in opposition to the amendment. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. upton: but support the amendment. -- i ask compliment for the five minutes in opposition. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. upton: i support the amendment. i congratulate the two, again, on a bipartisan amendment. this makes a strong policy on grid modernization. appreciate the work and i would urge my colleagues to support it and yield back the balance of my time. mrs. ellmers: mr. speaker, i yield back. the chair: the gentlelady from north carolina yields back. the question is on the amendment offered by the gentlelady from north carolina. those in favor say aye. known. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have -- those opposed no. in the opinion of the chair,
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the ayes have it. he amendment is agreed to. it is now in order to consider amendment number 9 printed in house report 114-359. s. jackson lee: mr. chairman.
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the chair: for what purpose does gentlelady texas seek recognition? does the gentlelady have an amendment? ms. jackson lee: let me express my appreciation. i have a revised amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment.
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the clerk: house report 114-359 offered by ms. jackson lee of texas. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 542, the gentlelady from texas and a member opposed
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each will control five minutes. does the gentlelady from texas seek unanimous consent to modify the amendment? ms. jackson lee: i do, yes. the chair: the clerk will report the amendment as modified. the clerk: modification to amendment number nine offered by ms. jackson lee of texas. add the following, section 11, grid resilience report, not later than 120 days after the date of enactment of this act, the secrety of the energy . all submit to the congress scandalism, terrorism and severe weather. the chair: is there objection to th modification of the amendment? hearing none, without objection, e modification is considered, pursuant to house resolution 542, theentlelady from texas, ms. jackson lee and a memb opposed each will control five minutes
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the chair recognizeshe gentlelady from texas. ms. jkson lee: let me express my appreciation to the chairman and e ranking member and the rules committee for allowing this amendment to come to the oor and thank the rules committee as well. as i begin, let me acknowledge that i think we have a and need commitment to continue to assess the electric grid. according to a department of energy report on the economic benefits of increasing electric grid resilience, the and need to electrical grid in texas is vull nashville to severe weather, cyberattacks, vandalism and terrorism. texas is only an example and i hold a letter from the senate committee on veterans affairs and the house committee on defense and veterans affairs to take note of the vulnerability. i use this letter from the state
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to say other states are in the same category. that is why the jackson amendment is relevant because it requires a report for challenges on energy as pertains to cyberattacks, vandalism, terrorism and severe weather. i sit on the cyber security subcommittee and we see vulnerabilities to the cybersecurity or the infrastructure. the importance of this amendment was underscored as i indicated. my amendment offers the utilization of geothermal power to address some of the energy insecurities faced by this nation. in today's world of natural and manmade disasters, seeking and implementing alternative measures such as that proposed in my amendment will address some of the insecurity measures. the natural suffered in my home state whether it is tornadoes or hurricanes, we know that the grid is an important survival
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asset for the nation. according to the d.o.e. report, he yearly cost of outages is between $18 and $33 billion. a level two emergency knocked out 9,355 megawatts. these warn us that they continue to stress our grid. thus, this amendment seeks to facilitate the united states' strategies of promoting utility infrastructure. i ask my colleagues to join me in ensuring through this report that we are in front of it if we can be to strengthen our electric grid, to look for alternatives, to be ahead of cybersecurity attacks, vandalism and weather conditions and ensure to the american public they have a resilient system. with that, i reserve and i ask
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my colleagues to support the amendment. the chair: the gentlelady's time is reserved. mr. upton: i would seek the time in opposition. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. upton: i support the amendment. i supported the amendment before revised and now that it is revised. support on methods to increase electric grid resilience with respect to all threats including cyber attacks, vandalism, severe weather and as amended it requires to submit to the congress versus the specific committees, i think it's a fine amendment and we support it. the chair: the gentlelady from texas. ms. jackson lee: i yield to the gentleman from new jersey, mr. pallone. mr. pallone: i just want to leaped my support to the legislation on grid resiliency
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and i think it's very important and i appreciate the gentlewoman putting it forward. i yield back. the chair: the gentlelady from texas. ms. jackson lee: at the appropriate time i would like to add into the record the letter and the house committee on defense and veterans affairs. the chair: that request is covered by general leave. ms. jackson lee: let me conclude by saying i thank mr. up ton and to -- upton and mr. pallone revise the amendment. to say this report on increasing methods to increase the electric grid resilience with respect to all threats, the report would go to the congress and i thank them very much and i ask my colleagues to support the jackson lee amendment and i yield back. the chair: the question is on the amendment as modified offered by the gentlelady from texas. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the
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ayes have it. the amendment, as modified, is agreed to. it is now in order to consider amendment number 10 printed in house report 114-359. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? >> i have an amendment at the desk. the clerk: amendment number 10 offered by mr. kildee of michigan. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 54 , the gentleman from michigan, mr. kildee and a member opposed each will control five minutes. mr. kildee: the national response operation is a joint operation between the u.s. coast guard and e.p.a. and it is the sole federal contact for reporting hazardous oil spills. it's our nation's 911 for dangerous spills. staffed by the coast guard 24 hours a day, passing on reports
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to relevant national response teams. those teams then go to the site of the spill, assess the situation and determine the best way to mitigate exposure and clean up the spill. often it is the coast guard being called upon to clean up a spill when it involves surface water. back in march, i visited a coast guard station and while i was there, we talked quite a bit about a serious deficiency in their capabilities, a serious deficiency that came to light in one of the greatest environmental disasters. in 2010, there was a large spill on the calla ma zoo river. and the coast guard was called upon to help with the cleanup efforts. when they arrived, they learned the equipment they had brought to the spill was for one type of oil, the oil they believed to have been involved in this
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particular of incident, but the oil in the river was an entirely different type and consistency than what they had expected and required a different cleanup method. valuable time was lost as the coast guard had to return back to this station hours away to get the right equipment and this spill continued into this river. the terrible scope of this could have been mitigated had the national response center possessed the basic information regarding the contents of that particular pipeline so they could pass the information onto the coast guard to address the spill when it occurred. currently, the response teams are often flying blind when they head out to spills. without this important information, the likelihood of much more serious damage of what we saw in the river is much higher. so i have been talking about lots of folks including the people within the coast guard with ways to improve their vaket
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to respond to this type of spill. the amendment i offered would require the g.a.o. to conduct a study of ways in which the capabilities of the national response center could be improved, including providing additional information on the contents of these pipelines. an independent study could then guide policy makers in improving the national response center, providing them the tools they need in the 21st century. this center receives over 6,000 calls per year across the country on all different sorts of spills. given the national response center the tools they need to respond to these incidents as quickly as possible is critical not only for protecting public health but preventing long-term damage. coming from michigan, the great lakes, i have 77 miles of shoreline we are concerned about
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surface water spills and this information is absolutely critical. and 40 million people depend on clean drinking water and those who are responsible have all the information and tools available to them. i ask my colleagues to support this amendment and with that, i reserve. the chair: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? mr. upton: i again ask for time in opposition. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. upton: i want to say to my good friend from the great state of michigan this is an issue that is close to both of our hearts and i want to go back when i was first elected a few years ago that one of the first bills i saw enacted into law was an oil spill response team for the great lakes. it was actually a visit i think to your district, bay city, which had a fairly significant oil spill and we found out that the coast guard was totally
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unprepared and my amendment was added to a highway bill to get it done. and when we had the oil spill on ago, we a few years looked at that and we actually undingell- undingell-jupton bil on pipeline safety which passed this body with 400 votes and when there is an oil spill, it had to be reported within an hour versus on a timely basis. that was a big change and now that we expect passage of the highway bill, we will be working to re-authorize pipeline safety bill and i'm led to believe we will start early next year and look forward to your support and anything to improve the current system is a good thing and i
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strongly support your amendment today and i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from michigan, mr. kildee. mr. kildee: i thank the chairman for his good work on this and look forward to working with you again on additional pipeline safety measures as they come to the floor. i appreciate your support for my amendment. i believe in quitting while i'm ahead. unless the chairman would like time i yield back. the chair: those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. he amendment is agreed to. the chair understands that amendment number 11, amendment number 11 will not be offered. it is now in order to consider amendment number 12 printed in house report 114-359. for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? i have an i:
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amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 12 printed in house report 114-359 offered by mr. garamendi of california. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 542, the gentleman from california, mr. garamendi, and a member opposed, each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california. mr. garamendi: thank you, mr. chairman. i'm trying to figure out who would be opposed to this amendment. so maybe i'll just talk my few minutes and go from there. the bill deals with energy, and i'm trying to figure out and -- let's see, energy, it goes along in wires. that would be electrical energy. if it's coal it's probably on a truck or train and if it's oil or gas, it may be in a pipeline, maybe a truck or boat or barge. but this bill doesn't speak to the transportation of energy, and so this amendment is extraordinarily important because it really says that if you're going to study energy you study how you're going to
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get it to wherever it needs to go. so this amendment, being such an important amendment and so long -- let's see, transport -- wow, not even 15 letters. that's all it does. it simply adds the word transportation to the study section of this bill, requiring the department of energy as it studies energy to study how it gets from here to there. that's it. now, i can go on for another four minutes or so, but after doing so it won't make any difference because we really need to study energy and figure out how it gets to where it needs to go so that's the amendment. add the word transportation in it. i will not yield all my time but i will yield back -- the chair: does the gentleman reserve? mr. garamendi: reserve. the chair: reserves. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? mr. upton: mr. chairman, i would seek the time in opposition. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. upton: but speak in support of the amendment.
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the chair: without objection. mr. upton: this amendment adds nclusion of the list of the -- includes energy transportation in the list of considerations for the energy security valuation report in section 3002 and ensure energy-related actions that significantly -- ct the supply, distory distribution, including their impact on the consumer and the economy. i think it's a good amendment. i urge my colleagues to support it and yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back his time. the gentleman from california is recognized and has 3 1/2 minutes remaining. mr. garamendi: i came in prepared for a brawl and all i get is acceptance of an amendment. well, i think i'll go with that and say thank you, mr. chairman, for the extraordinary wisdom that we both seem to have. thank you. i yield back my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back his time. the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from california. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. he amendment is agreed to.
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it is now in order to consider amendment number 13 printed in house report 114-359. for what purpose does the gentleman from west virginia seek recognition? mr. mckinley: mr. chairman, i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 13 printed in house report 114-359 offered by mr. mckinley of west virginia. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 542, the gentleman from west virginia, mr. mckinley, and a member opposed, each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from west virginia. mr. mckinley: thank you, mr. chairman. and, again, i applaud the committee and particularly the staff for the hard work they've done in putting together this comprehensive piece of legislation on energy. it's been long overdue to have that energy bill so i'm delighted it's here on the floor. i rise today in support of an amendment which is co-sponsored by my colleague from montreal, congressman zenky. this -- from money tana, congressman zinke.
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it says no one can be denied until all reviews required under the national environmental policy act, known as nepa, have been completed. the nepa review process is critical to ensure that the communities can provide input on any proposed project and it allows the developer the opportunity to work with the citizens of a community and the regulatory agency to address any concerns that may arise. denying a permit request for coal export facility before the would cess is complete send a precedent that indicates that those voices of affected parties don't matter and diminish the value of the nepa process. this amendment will ensure that a regulatory agency must first take into consideration the merits of the project, voices of the people, their thoughts, concerns and the findings of he nepa report before acting
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on permit and simply, simply not advancing an anti-coal ideology. i urge my colleagues to support this amendment, and i was to yield my time -- the balance of my time to congressman zinke. i don't see him here yet. the chair: does the gentleman reserve? mr. mckinley: i reserve my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey seek recognition? mr. pallone: mr. chairman, i claim the time in opposition to the amendment. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. pallone: thank you, mr. chairman. time after time democratic members have come to the floor to strike bad nepa language from bills only to be voted down by republicans who use streamlining as a euphemism for letting polluters do whatever they want. now they expect us to believe they're sincere about keeping nepa strong in one perverse scenario in which they think it could help them. but i don't think that passes the red face test. what's more, the amendment
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undermines the treaty rights of the loomy nation and jeopardizes the sovereignty of all tribes with rights to natural resources. mr. chairman, tomorrow we'll be here on the house floor to vote on the conference report for a highway bill which includes over the opposition of many democrats sweeping exemptions from the requirements of the national environmental policy act. i have no doubt that both of the sponsors of this amendment support those exemptions and will vote to pass the bill without a second thought about the fact that it short-circuits nepa review for many, many infrastructure projects. so i'm shocked seeing them here with straight faces when it benefits them and the coal industry the nepa process should be thorough and complete. it's a level of audacity that i think is laughable. i ask my colleagues to vote no on this damaging and disingenuous amendment and i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back his time. the gentleman from west virginia. mr. mckinley: i yield to congressman zinke. mr. zinke: thank you, mr.
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chairman. to clarify, this amendment does not violate treaty rights and suggest it does is disingenuous and false. this is about fairness. it's not about two tribes. it's about fairness of a process. it will be unprecedented for the army corps of engineers to bypass the eeis to make a decision, and that's what -- that's what this amendment does. it's not about coal. it's not about commodities, nor is it about treaty rights, because quite frankly, the crow tribe in montana has treaty rights too, but this is not to pit one poor nation against a rich nation. it's about simple fairness. it would be unprecedented for the army corps of engineer or any government body to give judgment before the process is complete, and that's what we're
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asking for. the e.i.s. is the process that needs to be done. and with that i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back his time. does the gentleman from west virginia yield? mr. mckinley: i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from west virginia. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. he amendment is agreed to. it is now in order to consider amendment number 14 printed in house report 114-539. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. green: mr. speaker, i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 14 printed in house report 114-359 offered by mr. gene green of texas. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 542, the gentleman from texas, mr. green, and a member opposed, each will
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control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas. i yield : mr. speaker, myself such time as i may consume. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. mr. green: i rise in support of an amendment that would create regulatory certainty with our neighbors, canada and mexico. the presidential permitting process dates back many administrations, beginning in the administration of ulysses s. grant, the executive branch has made sure our cross-bored infrastructure between canada and the u.s. is constructed. the past administration and current administration has been forced to use executive orders because congress has failed to act. congress has the ability to -- cross-bored energy infrastructure projects fall well within that space. we need to create a system with our neighbors, mexico and canada, to truly create a north american energy market and that's what this amendment would do. we can't build infrastructure in this country or in this continent based on who sits in
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the white house. there are 11 cross-border projects awaiting a decision now by the department of state and the president, include electricity wires, water pipes. it's congress' responsibility to create regulatory rules by which infrastructure is constructed. as a reminder of this, tomorrow we'll pass the conference report on the fast act. the fast act is a multiyear transportation bill that shows our determination to build infrastructure of the 21st century. now we must build on that success and focus on our energy infrastructure. this amendment would create a regulatory process of the department of state, department of energy, to permit cross-border infrastructure. there's no difference than building roads or bridges or railways. the department of transportation coordinates with federal, state and local agencies to ensure the project is completed and the environment protected. we will do the same thing with pipes and wires. we need to build elect trick are rick -- electric
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transmission pipelines and the amendment complies with the national environmental policy act and requires full environmental review of any cross-border facility including analysis of the climate change impacts. the entire length of the pipeline or electric transmission line will be reviewed for all -- and for environmental impacts. this amendment's about the future and how to meet the 21st century demands that our country needs. we should embrace the changes taking place in north america with rmonize our policies those of our neighbors, both to the north and south. i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman's time is reserved. for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey rise? mr. pallone: i seek time in opposition. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. pallone: thank you, mr. chairman. this amendment makes an end run around the national environmental policy act. the amendment would simply elimination any -- eliminate any review of large
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transboundary infrastructure projects by redefining and narrowly looking at nepa's review. this amendment restricts nepa review only to that small portion that physically crosses the border and that defies common sense. we're talking about massive projects that are more than just a border crossing. when we approve a transboundary pipeline or transmission line, we're approving multibillion dollar infrastructure that stretches for hundreds of miles and lasts through decades. it crosses through water bodies, farms, aquifers. they carry substances that can catch fire or spill and pollute the environment and they have profound implications for climate change. to understand the potential of an environmental impact of a project we need to look at the project of a whole. to only look at the tiny sliver of land makes no sense. imagine going to the doctor if you're feeling sick and the
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doctor gives you a clean bill of health after looking only at your elbow and that's what this amendment does. by redefining the scope of nepa's inquiry to only encompass the step across the border. it makes the process of environmental review essentially meaningless and no meaningful review means no opportunity to mitigate potential harm to public health, public safety or the environment. mr. chairman, nepa provides policymakers with a critical tool to understand potential impacts and consider lower impact alternatives. nepa doesn't dictate the outcome or impose any constraints on projects. fundamentally, it requires us to look before we leap and that's just basic common sense. we should not be punching loopholes in this law. but the amendment doesn't just stop there. it also creates a rebuttal for presumption that every cross-border project is in the public interest, tipping the scale in their approval and that's a subtle but significant change. coupled with a small portion of projects being reviewed, the amendment makes it virtually impossible to ever prove that a
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project is not in the public interest. of this amendment argue that a new process is necessary for reviewing and approving cross-border projects, but if congress is going to establish new permitting rules through legislation, it should do so in a thoughtful and balanced way. instead, this amendment creates a process that rubber stamps projects and eliminates meaningful environmental review and public participation. and frankly, this amendment is just another attempt to bring trans-canada's keystone x.l. pipeline back from the grave. the president has already rejected their application and we have wasted enough time on this canadian pipe dream. the keystone x.l. pipeline is a lose-lose proposition for energy security, a lose-lose for safe climate and healthy environment and we shouldn't be trying to create a weaker approval process to provide a new pathway for its approval. adoption of this amendment will undoubtedly benefit trans-canada and other multinational oil companies but it will not help the american people that we're here to
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represent. i yield back, mr. chairman. the chair: the gentleman yields back his time. the gentleman from texas. mr. green: mr. speaker, how much time do i have? the chair: the gentleman is recognized -- the gentleman has 2 1/2 minutes. mr. green: this amendment passed the house last session and didn't pass in the senate. but it does have the nepa process throughout the -- throughout the whole -- whether it's a pipeline or transmission line, from literally not just the border but also to the destinations and is not just a keystone. e have natural gas pipelines pipelines being built from texas to mexico. 20 years from now, we'll need those pipelines reversed to bring natural gas from mexico. i'd like to yield the remaining time to the chair of the energy and commerce committee. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. mr. upton: this is similar to the bill i introduced last year, last congress, and it did pass the house with some bipartisan support. this amendment establishes a
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straightforward and predictable procedure to permit cross border pipelines and electric transmission facilities. it's not keystone, we're over that battle. time to move beyond that. but we want certainty, this is an important amendment in order for the u.s. to fully benefit from our energy abundance, we've got to encourage rather than obstruct, trade with our good neighbors, particularly the canadians as well as the mexicans, an energy policy that works. let's do this. the amendment is a good one. i yield back the balance of my time. mr. green: i want to encourage members to support the amendment. we need to bring our country and with our trading partners on the north and south border for energy issues too. and i yield back my time and encourage an aye vote. the chair: the gentleman yields back. the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from texas. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. the gentleman from new jersey. >> i ask for the yeas and nays.
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the chair: does the gentleman ask for a recorded vote in mr. pallone: yes. the chair: pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, further proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from texas is postponed. the chair understands that amendment number 15 will not be offered. it is now in order to consider amendment number 16 printed in house report 114-359. for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 16, offered by mr. takano of california. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 542, the gentleman from california, mr. takano, and a member opposed each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california. mr. takano: mr. speaker, i rise today in support of this bipartisan amendment which brings us one step closer to realizing the enormous potential of energy storage. this technology is capable of transforming our energy
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landscape by storing pow for the times of excess production and releasing pow for the times of excess demand. it can make our grid more reliable and secure, it can save consumers money by replacing costly gas powered stations and pratches most importantly, it is compatible with any source of energy. it's come -- its compatibility with multiple powers sources means we aren't picking winners and losers. rather, we are increasing our capacity to use all sources of energy. battery storage is particularly promising in its ability to unlock the pow over of renewables leading to a clear, more sustainable energy portfolio. even as the costs of renewable energy sources drops closer to that of fossil fuels, the viability of wind and solar power is limited by inconsistency. put simply, the wind doesn't always blow and the sun doesn't
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always shine. battery energy storage offers a solution to this challenge. this week, at the climate summit in paris, we've heard about the importance of innovation in reaching our environmental goals. battery storage is exactly the type of revolutionary technology that will help get us there, creating new jobs and economic growth in the process. a g.a.o. report on large scale battery storage will help us make informed decisions about accelerating its growth while signaling our commitment to supporting the next chapter in america's energy infrastructure. i am thankful to be joined by mr. collins from new york, as well as my good friend and colleague, mr. honda of california. thank you, and i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman's time is reserved. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan rise? mr. upton: i seek time in opposition. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes.
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mr. upton: i support the amendment. i -- it's a good amendment. it needs to be included. i urge my colleagues to vote yes. i yield back. the chair: the gentleman from california. mr. takano: thank you for supporting this bipartisan amendment, mr. chairman. i'm honored to have that support. i encourage its adoption and yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the request is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from california. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. he amendment is agreed to. it is now in order to consider amendment number 17 printed in house report 114-359. for what purpose does the gentleman from virginia seek recognition? mr. beyer: i offer an amendment at they have desk. the chair: clerk will report the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 17 offered by mr. beyer of virginia. the chair: the gentleman from virginia mr. beyer and a member opposed each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the
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gentleman from virginia. mr. beyer: i yield myself such time as i may consume. my amendment preserves section 453. the infrastructure act deliberately moves energy goals for public buildings. in 2007 under the energy independence and security act, our last energy infrastructure overhaul bill, a provision was included to set a goal for new federal buildings to have netzero energy usage by 2030. this naturally also meant the federal government would have a corresponding goal of reducing fossil fuel generated electricity consumption in its buildings. this was forward think, the federal government would lead by example in the transition to less polluting buildings and show what the next generation of infrastructure should look like. now is not the time to roll back this goal. when people say h.r. 8 would take us back to a 19th century energy economy. this is -- economy, this is one example they can point to.
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to ignore this source of pollution at a time when we're trying to keep temperatures from rising less than two degrees centigrade isn't just negligent, it ignores our responsibility to be a good sturet of the earth and leave it in good condition for yen rations to come. with the federal government as the largest consume over energy in the u.s., we must be the leader. this effort is under attack because of outdated feasibility concerns, concerns which have already been addressed. last year the department of energy proposed a rule that charts a path forward to reach the 2030 goal as both techny -- technically possible and plausible. i want to address some myths about section 433. some characterized it as, quolet, a ban on the fovet using energy from fossil fuels. the law does no such thing. at no point does this require zero fossil fuel use for any building designer -- designed or renovated before 2030. despite objections from my friends at the american gas association, the american -- it
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proposes carveouts for natural gas usage in highly efficient combined heat and power systems. natural gas may be an important part of the solution of getting to netzero energy usage. to require federal buildings to meet energy targets not only reduces costs, it reduces our dependence on foreign oil and leverages the government's large purchasing power to bring new technologies and materials to the marketplace. will ecost 433, it americans millions over the next several years. not only are the current targets achieveable, some buildings are already meeting the 2030 goals right now. the e.u. adopted a similar goal with a shorter time zone. mr. chairman, during my four years in switzerland, we cut the carbon foot fingerprint of the u.s. embassy in half and reduced the carbon foot fingerprint of our home to zero. netzero s opened a
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energy store in 2013 in illinois. a true value hardware store was the first netzero energy building in new york state. we use the goal as a means to reduce costs and increase energy security. from 2007 to 2013, the federal government reduced energy usage by % while we continue to grow. we must continue to encourage energy reduction efforts. we learned a long time ago that we don't have a goal, we never get there. we have to have a target we can all work to meet. i urge my colleagues to support my amendment, to reinstate the energy usage goals for federal building and i yield back, mr. chairman. the chair: the gentleman yields back his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from kentucky seek recognition? >> to claim time in opposition. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. >> with all due regard to the gentleman offering this amendment, i rise to oppose the amendment which would reinstate the provisions of section 433
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which prohibits the use of fossil fuels in new and modified federal buildings after the year 2030. now it is true that the department of energy is trying to thread a needle through regulations that might allow fossil fuels to be used in new and modified federal buildings after 2030. but we know the reality is that every environmental group in the country will file a lawsuit against that regulation when it comes out if it's interpreted in any way that fossil fuels might be used. mr. whitfield: i'm shocked that people would be opposed to our wanting to use fossil fuels after the year 2030. we're not mandating that they be used. but everyone that comes to this floor, particularly president obama when he goes anywhere he talks about an all of the above energy policy.
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and yet, that 2007 energy policy act prohibited fossil fuel use in new and modified federal buildings after the year 2030. so our base bill does not mandate the use, but it simply says basically that the government will be able to do it if it's necessary. so why should the federal government not allow any -- the opportunity to use any fossil fuel after 2030? you know, we already have a federal debt approaching $20 trillion. now, natural gas prices are pretty kilo right now. but let's say they go up. let's say that renewables go up. that for some reason maybe using coal is more economical and using a super ultra, super critical facility. we know that the president does not want to build any new coal powered plant because regulations now prohibit that.
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but we think it's important that we have an all of the above energy policy and our base bill allows that even in government buildings and so for that reason, i would respectfully oppose the gentleman's amendment and ask that our members vote against the amendment and would yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from virginia. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. the gentleman from kentucky. mr. whitfield: i ask for a recorded vote. the chair: pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18 further proceed option the amendment offered by the gentleman from virginia will e postponed. it is now in order to consider amendment number 18 printed in house report 114-359. for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? mr. peters: i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 18 printed in house report 114-359
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offered by mr. peters of california. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 542, the gentleman from california, mr. peters, and a member opposed each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california. mr. peters: thank you, mr. chairman. my amendment to the north american security and infrastructure act requires the secretary of energy to submit a report to congress on the impact of captured methane converted for energy on federal lands, buildings and relevant municipalities. it would include a summary of performance and savings from using this source and an analysis of the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. in my district in san diego we're putting innovative systems to work to reduce emissions and put that to work at the same time. in luoma linda, methane is collected and used, and the water plant has become energy self-sufficient and is able to sell excess power to the local
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grid, enhancing grid reliability and energy efficiency. another example of converting captured methane to electricity is landfills. we have over 1,900 landfills, the third largest source in the aired states this threatens quality close to landfills and in san diego, the miramar landfill spans 50 acres and has been operating since 1959. some years ago, the city, the navy and the private sector installed a methane capture and conversion plant to supply it with 13.4 mega watts of energy this plant supplies half of the base's energy, allowing it to operate as a 911 base in case of an emergency or power outage. my amendment will simply assess how capturing methane and using
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it to generate energy reduces emissions. it puts america on a path to a lower carbon renewable energy future and shares best practices among facilities that might be able to participate. so i ask my colleagues to support the amendment and i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman's time is reserved. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan rise? mr. upton: mr. chairman, i would seek the time in opposition. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. upton: and again support the amendment. we have no objection to the amendment. we think it's worthwhile and urge my colleagues to support it and yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from california. peertsportse again, i thank the -- mr. peters: again, i thank the chairman and his support for this amendment and i yield back. the chair: the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from california. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. the amendment is agreed to. it is now in order to consider amendment number 19 printed in house report 114-359. for what purpose does the gentlelady from illinois seek recognition? ms. schakowsky: mr. chairman, i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 19 printed in house report 114-359
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offered by ms. schakowsky of illinois. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 532, the gentlelady from illinois, ms. schakowsky, and a member opposed, each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentlelady from illinois. ms. schakowsky: thank you, mr. chairman. my amendment would preserve an existing consumer right that has been on the books for many years. the section 4125 of this legislation would prevent consumers from pursuing breach of warrant claims against product manufacturers that inaccurately claim energy star compliance. as i said, in doing so would eliminate an existing consumer right. while i see no justification for this change, i see the motive, the association of home appliance manufacturers, which represents 95% of u.s. home appliances and has endorsed this provision, wants to avoid liability.
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consumers pay a premium for energystar products, but they don't pay extra because they have a sense of charity. they do it because they promise the energystar appliance they have been promised that these appliances will enable reduced energy usage and lower operation costs. in fact, energystar products promise a 10% to 25% energy efficiency improvement as compared to federal minimum standards. so when a manufacture falsely claims to be energystar compliant, consumers are left with a more expensive product without any of the promised benefits. it amounts really to fraud. in the past, manufacturers, including the association members samsung, l.g. and whirlpool have falsely claimed that their products meet energystar specifications. consumers have mobilized to be compensated for those false claims and they deserve that right.
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my amendment would enable them to retain it. aham claims that my amendment would, quote, discourage robust participation, unquote, in the energystar program. frankly, i don't see that as a problem. if manufacturers can't stand by their claims of energystar compliance, then they shouldn't participate in the program. those manufacturers that continue to make energystar products will reap the rewards, including higher consumer demand and bigger profits and that's a win for consumers, honest manufacturers and the energystar program. so i ask my colleagues, please to support this amendment and i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentlelady's time is reserved. for what purpose does the gentleman from ohio seek recognition? >> mr. chairman, i rise in opposition. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i rise today in opposition to the amendment to strike section 4125 of the bill which is
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language that representative welch and i have co-authored over the past two congresses with bipartisan support. mr. latta: it was developed with a cross-section of manufacturerses and the e.p.a. by rejecting this amendment and keeping our language, we have an opportunity to encourage manufacturers to continue participation in the energystar program. energystar is a highly successful voluntary program. consumers, manufacturers and the government all win under energystar. the program is designed to be low cost and low compliant to incentivize participation by manufacturers and the language included in this bill is needed to continue to incentivize participation. for a product to be branded with the energystar logo, it must meet certain energy-saving guidelines, manufacturers who choose to participate in this voluntary program make the necessary investments needed to
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increase the energy efficiency of their products. in order to ensure their products maintain the required levels of efficiency, the department of energy performs off-the-shelf testing. if a product pails to meet the standard, that product is disqualified and then publicly listed on the energystar website. merely following a product's disqualification listing, the e.p.a. and the manufacture will work together. it does not prevent lawsuits from being filed. it requires that the suit be filed before a suit is disqualified from energystar. if a product has been disqualified from the program by e.p.a., the e.p.a. best position to adjust consumer impact and it is required on the part of the manufacture. the e.p.a. -- the e.p.a. process is swift compared to legal proceedings, which could take years. if the focus is really on
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consumer reimbursement, shouldn't those fighting for consumer rights prefer the e.p.a. disqualification process over class action litigation? in the e.p.a. disqualification process, the entire reimbursement goes to the consume versus to legal proceeding where lease can go toward the award. it has promoted economic expansion and job growths for manufacturers across the nation. in defeating this amendment we have an opportunity tone courage participation by manufacturers instead of discouraging participation. this section has the support of the national association of manufacturers, the alliance to save energy, the american council for energy efficient economy and the chamber of commerce. and mr. chairman, i would ask to reject the amendment and reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman's time is reserved. the gentlelady from illinois. ms. schakowsky: may i inquire as to how much time i have left? the chair: the gentlelady from illinois has 2 1/2 minutes
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remaining. ms. schakowsky: thank you. you know, all this would be fine if it weren't the case that we have members of the association of home appliance manufacturers that actually have falsely claimed their products meet energystar specifications. and nothing in the remedy actually says that the consumer will have the right to reclaim their money that they spent on the washer or the dryer or the appliance that was bought because they thought they would both save energy and over time that they would save money as well. and as i said earlier, in rule, this law has been in place for many years. it does not interfere with the fact that this is a voluntary program, that the companies decide if they want to participate in energystar -- to be an energystar product, but it does say they have to keep their promise and they have to keep their promise, not just to
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e.p.a. or some regulatory framework. they have to keep their promise to the individual consumer who has actually laid out the bucks to buy that product. and this provides an opportunity for that consumer to be able to reclaim a product if it's found not to meet the energystar promise that they made of 10% to 25% energy efficiency improvement. and so it seems to me that why would this body go about the business of taking away a consumer right? i thought we're supposed to be in the business of trying to figure out how we're going to adequately protect consumers, not in a generic sense, but in the individual sense. that's the kind of protection that we've had, and that's the kind of protection i believe that we should maintain and that this section put it in at the behest of the industry makes no sense. goes away the
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manufacturers and towards the consumers. if there's any time left i'd like to reserve it. the chair: the gentlelady's time is reserved. the gentleman from ohio. mr. latta: i reserve. the chair: the gentleman reserves. the gentlelady from illinois. ms. schakowsky: i'll close. i'm very disappointed as someone who has been a consumer advocate for a very long time and many ways and especially in terms of truth and products, truth in labeling -- truth in products, truth in labeling, that we ought to rely on that energystar label to know that it's going to give us the energy efficiency that we paid for and that if it doesn't we do have a remedy and those remedies tend to make the manufacturers even more honest. so i hope we'll get some support. thank you. the chair: the gentleman from ohio. mr. latta: thank you, will chairman. again, i would urge defeat of
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the amendment because we want to make sure that manufacturers are still encouraged to participate in the energystar program, which has been highly successful. and with that, mr. chairman, i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the question is on the amendment offered by the gentlelady from illinois. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. ms. schakowsky: mr. chairman. the chair: the gentleman from ohio asks for a recorded vote? pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, further proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentlelady from illinois will e postponed. it is now in order to consider amendment number 20 printed in house report 114-359. for what purpose does the gentlelady from indiana seek recognition? ms. brooks: i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 20 printed in house report 114-359
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offered by mrs. brooks of indiana. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 542, the gentlelady from indiana, mrs. brooks, and a member opposed, each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentlelady from brooks. mrs. brooks: my amendment calls on the department of energy and the office of management and budget to take another look at what is now 20-year-old data about how used oil is managed in the united states and to develop comprehensive strategies to increase recycling used oil as part of a national strategy to save energy and reduce pollution. right now there are options for disposal of motor oil, commonly used in trucks and cars. the worst option is for that oil to be simply discarded, leading to contaminants polluting our air and water. if properly collected, the oil can be burned once for use as low-cost fuel. however, the best office uses
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modern technology which now exists to collect and sustainably recycle used oil. these refining techniques can now produce a product that is a -- an equivalent to virgin-based oil. it conserves most of the energy needed from oil. re-refining can turn what used o be a waste product into an infin nitly -- infan italy reused oil. it is also cost competitive, reduces waste and reduces emissions. earlier studies done by d.o.e., as well as our national labs, showed that used motor oil as a valuable and reasonable energy resource. as the motorsports capital of the world, indianapolis, that is, it's no surprise that indiana has traditionally been a leader in recycling and refining oil. we have two major used oil refineries in indiana, employing almost 1,000 people,
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and our state has a proud tradition of utilizing this product and promoting its technology. re-refined oil is already being actively used by d.o.d. and other federal agencies, public and commercial fleets and average consumers with great success. however, far too little of our used oil is recycled in this way, and so my amendment is intended to increase conservation and sustainable reuse. the last major federal study was called for in the energy policy act of 2005. that study was issued in 2006 but relied on data that was then 10 years old. now that data is 20 years old. my amendment will require d.o.e. to update that data so that we know how much oil is available and how much is actually being reused and re-refined. data from 20 years ago show that the united states was well behind other developed and even some developing countries in terms of sustainable reuse.
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this amendment will also provide for the development of policies that can significantly increase but the collection rate and sustainable reuse of his valuable resource. . i have nothing further. yield to the gentleman. mr. upton: this calls for a review, it's a good amendment, promotes recycling of lubricating oils to save energy and avoid disposal in landfills, a-- improves public information concerning sustainable reuse options. it's a good amendment, i'd like to see it adopted and yield back. ms. brooks: i urge adoption of the amendment, i reserve. the chair: no one claims time in opposition. the gentlelady from indiana. ms. brooks: i yield back. the chair: the question is on the amendment offered by the
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gentlelady from indiana. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the of the chair the ayes have it. the amendment is agreed to. the chair: for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? mr. upton: i ask to offer the ellmers amendment. the chair: ask unanimous consent? mr. upton: i ask unanimous consent to offer the ellmers amendment. the chair: without objection, the clerk will report the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 21, printed in house report 114-359, offered by mr. upton of
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michigan. the chair: pursuant to section 542 and without objection, the gentleman from michigan, mr. upton and a member opposed each will control five minutes. mr. upton: i won't take the full five minutes. i offer this in lieu of mrs. ellmers. it takes a simple technical fecks to d.o.e.'s external mower supply rule. i'm not aware of any opposition, i urge my colleagues to support it and yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back. no one claims time in opposition. the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from michigan. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. it is now in order to consider amendment number 22. for what purpose does the gentleman from new york seek recognition? mr. tonko: i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. clomentaurm 22 offered by mr. -- the clerk: amendment number 22
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offered by mr. tonko of new york. the chair: the gentleman from new york and a member opposed each will croif fine mives. the gentleman from new york. mr. tonko: this affects the weather assistance program and another program, they've both been operate for several years. it leverages additional funding from our states. these programs address real problems, they're effective and create and sustain jobs. as we heard during debit yesterday, h r. 8 does little to advance energy efficiency. an issue that's enjoyed strong bipartisan support in the past. in fact, some provisions are more likely to be a setback to efficiency standards. while this bill contains plenty of benefits for energy suppliers, there's very little in there designed to address the needs of the average american. the weatherization assistance program supports state-based programs to improve the energy stishtcy of the homes of low income family. the department of energy provides grants to the states, united states territories, and
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tribal governments to deliver these services through local weatherization agencies. the weatherization measures used include air sealing, wall and attic insulation, duct sealing and furnace repair and replacement. the benefits of weatherization are well known and result in a reduced energy bill for years into the future. insulating walls and roofs can provide savings for the lifetime of the house. other measures like making heating or cooling equipment more efficient can provide savings for more than a decade. the weatherization program has helped improve the lives of more than seven million families by reducing electricity bills. the program provides energy efficiency services to thousands of homes every year, redeucing average costs by more than $400 per household in annual utility bills. investments in energy efficiency pay for themselves over time but the up front costs can be significant. and when a family's budget is
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severely limited, those costs are simply too high. the weatherization program helps those in our communities who do not have the financial resources to make energy efficiency investments on their own. that includesing our elderly, our disabled and our low-income families. these vulnerable households are often on fixed incomes and are the most susceptible to volatile changes in electricity prices. they are particularly vulnerable to spikes in electricity bills in heat waves or cold weather due to poor insulation or inefficient appliances. a sudden increase in expenses is difficult to manage for many families. low income families already spend a disproportionate amount of their income on energy cost. the state energy program provides funding to the states to support the work of their energy offices. it ensures that each state will have basic funding available to support its programs. these offices play a role in helping states to find the least
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costly ways to meet state goals for energy efficiency, for air quality, for fuel diversity and for energy security. according to a study by the oak ridge national laboratory, the state energy programs often leverage for every one federal dollar $10.71 in state and private funds. that's a great return on investment. congress last rethordsed these programs back in 2007 for a five-year period at about $1 billion per year for weatherization and $125 million per year for the state energy program. my amendment authorizes the weatherization program for another five years but at lower levels, $450 million per year and the state energy program is authorized for five years at $75 million per year. these are robust authorization levels for certain and while i believe these programs should be appropriated even more funding, this amendment authorized them at her -- lower levels to be
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more in tune with today's fiscal constraints. i ask my colleagues to support my amendment and help to extend the benefits of energy efficiency to our families so that more families can be supported by local jobs, businesses, and certainly contractors that do this extremely important work. with that, i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman's time is reserved. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? mr. upton: i seek time in opposition. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. upton: i do so to oppose the amendment because the -- as we all know, this amendment re-authorizes the federal weatherization assistance program at $2.2 billion through 2020 and the state energy program at $375 million through 2020. but our feeling is it's not needed because the department of energy's weatherization assistance program is already extremely well funded. in recent years, and i support
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weatherization, because i think most of our colleagues on both sides of the aisle do, but congress has been funding the program at or near the department's requested levels. so this is in essence billions above in new spending on an existing program that the department of energy has not requested. the 2009, i would note that the 2009 stimulus bill included $5 billion extra to department of energy for weatherization. roughly 17 times what was originally appropriated for that year. furthermore, using experimenting considered the gold standards for evidence, researchers from u.c. berkley, m.i.t., university of chicago recently released a report on a first of its kind field test of the federal weatherization assistance program. the study found that the costs of energy efficient investments were about double the actual savings.
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that model projected savings are 2 1/2 times the actual savings. and that even when accounting for the broader societal benefits of energy efficiency investments, the costs will substantially outweigh the benefits. the average rate of return is minus 9.5% annually. so the overall legislation today that's before us is extremely specific in authorizing budget neutral spending for energy security efforts only. authorizing additional money beyond requested amounts, as this weatherization does -- weatherization amendment does, does not have the justify set and therefore i would ask my colleagues to vote no on the amendment and i yield back my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from new york. mr. tonko: if i may reclaim my time. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. mr. tonko: certainly, the numbers here speak to the most vulnerable in our society. and there are waiting lists that
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i know exist in states. there are many, many -- there are more things we can do for energy efficiency's sake for our most stressed family budgets. this is a situation where energy costs as a wedge of the pie for our poor families, for their household budgets, is far greater a slice than it is for the average residents of this country. this is a hard, hard -- this is a hard-hearted approach taken to our elderly, to our low income families, to the disabled. also i would suggest that our goal here should be to be as resourceful as possible with our energy fix across this country. any time we can reduce consumption, we're doing a big thing for all rate payers. i think this is missing the focus that is, the statements show a missing of the focus that's needed. finally to the study. it was a one-state, one-utility study. it was not peer-reviewed. it's flawed. it did not really show the real issues out there for this bill.
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the chair: the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from new york. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair the noes have it. the gentleman from new york. mr. tonko: i call for a recorded vote. the chair: pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, further proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from new york will be postponed. it is now in order to consider amendment number 23 prin nod house report 114-359. for what purpose does the gentlelady from florida rise in ms. cass otore: i have an amendment -- ms. castor: i have an amendment at the desk. the clerk: the clerk will report the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 23 offered by ms. castor of florida. the chair: the gentlelady from florida, ms. castor, and a member opposed each will control five minute. the chair recognizes the gentlelady from florida. ms. castor: my amendment focuses on thermal energy and combined heat power, essential to a smart energy future for our country. but they are often overlook.
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they are overlooked components of our national energy supply. in the united states, up to 36% of the total energy produced is lost from power plants, industrial facilities an buildings in the form of waste heat. my amendment will help industry, universities, hospitals and others capture that waste heat and use renewables for heating, cooling, and power generation. now i want to read the definition of what is included in renewables so everyone is aware. biomass, geothermal, land fill gas, municipal solid waste, organic waste, photo synthetic processes, photovoltaic processes, solar and wind. what's happening across america are businesses and nonprofits are getting really smart about this wasted energy and they're putting it back into their facilities to save energy and save money. and the overall resilience an cost savis that can be achieved through combined heat and power and distributed energy
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systems is proven every day but it was especially proven in superstorm sandy and other natural disasters. during superstorm sandy, businesses and nonprofits, such as hospitals and universities, were able to keep the lights on and actually had heat and water in the aftermath of the storm because they had these self-contained energy efficient, waste heat projects. we've also heard testimony in the energy and power subcommittee extensively on the importance in the fure of these smaller distributed locally based energy systems. i've also seen it in my hometown in tampa where the st. joseph's hospital burns the medical waste, turns it into waste heat and they're now saving $200,000 a ar on their energy bills where they can keep the lights . they don't have to pay that out to the power company. that can go back into the care
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of patients. so what my amendment proposes to do is to help overcome the financing hurdles that will be key in implementing this highly efficient and resilient energy infrastructure my amendment would establish an initiative to pride cost-shared funding for technical assistance, for feasibility studies and engineering and enable qualifying infrastructure projects to access lower interest debt financing through a loan guarantee program. industrial competitiveness will be enhced because these businesses will be ablto develop new revenue stream rerks deuce energy cost, reduce emissions, anenhance energy supply resiliency. we've got to plan ahead here in america. we've got to bemarter and according to a joint d.o.e. and e.p.a. study, roughly 65 gigawatts of technical po potential remain in the nation's hospitals, universities, wastewater treatment plants and other critical infrastructure. my amendment will help reduce the up front capital costs of installing these locally based
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energy efficient systems. these systems have proven themselves and we should encourage them. so i respectfully request that the house act with an eye toward the future. take this modest but very important step to help unleash american innovation. we know how to do this. we can do this. let's give our businesses and universities and hospitals an incentive to put waste energy to work and at the same time save some money. i urge an aye vote on m amendment and reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentlelady's time is reserved. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? . upton: i seek time in on -- time in opposition to this amendment. this would establish a d.o.e. loan program to for generation, and while i support some of the goals in this amendment, i cannot support a new loan guarantee program given the failures that this administration has had in issuing loans an i remember one
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called solyndra a long time ago. in any event this amendment is too broad. there are often economic reasons to use nonlocal energy sources and to use them on a large scale than distributed generation. moreover, this is duplicative of other d.o.e. programs as well as tax incentives, state programs that use distributed energy. circumstances do vary across regions, so states should decide whether and how to encourage distributed energy. the federal government shouldn't be picking winners and losers, so i would urge my colleagues to vote no and yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentlelady from florida. ms. castor: i would -- i thank the chairman for supporting some of the goals contained in the amendment. this is not an open-ended loan program. his is a very modest, only authorized for $250 million. the appropriators will probably
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scale that back. what it does, it allows our hospitals, universities and other industrial users across the country some upfront technical assistance that will save them a lot of money and a lot of energy on the downside. so this modest investment will have a great payoff for taxpayers and for industrial users, our hospitals and universities. i've seen it work right in my district. i know it worked during superstorm sandy. we have to think with an eye to the future and act that way. i request an aye vote on this amendment and i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the question is on the amendment offered by the gentlelady from florida. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the noes have it. and the amendment is not agreed to. the gentlelady from florida. ms. castor: i ask for a recorded vote. the chair: pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, further proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentlelady from florida will be postponed. it is now in order to consider amendment number 24 printed in
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house report 114-359. for what purpose does the gentleman from colorado seek recognition? mr. polis: i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 24 printed in house report 114-359 offered by mr. polis of colorado. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 542, the gentleman from colorado, mr. polis, and a member opposed, each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from colorado. mr. polis: thank you, mr. chairman. i want to explain how in many states, including my home state of colorado, landowners, if you live in a home and you own your property, you bought it, you're not necessarily, in most cases you are not in fact also the owner of the minerals beneath your land. it's called split estate. many surface estates in my state were split from their subsurface or mineral states, severed, and congress rewrote the rules of the homestead act to maintain ownership over minerals even though they gave away western lands for development. again, what that means is we have suburban subdevelopments, people live in their homes and
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the federal government owns the mineral rights under those homes. along with that comes the right to extract those minerals. fails fortunately what to -- fails to be present in those -- in the homestead act is protections and note anycation requirements for the people that live there, the homeowners. so in some cases, in colorado and elsewhere, landholders and homeowners don't even know that there has been a lease or a drill permit on their land, where they own the surface rights. literally one day an oil company can drive up to the property and construct a horizontal drill in the middle of your back yard without notification. so you can imagine the result, harm and loss of cattle or crops, infrastructure on their property, not knowing what is occurring and really it's been amazing to see the ability of the extraction industry to operate without having to
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address the legitimate concerns of surface owners. now, my bill doesn't change all of that, and frankly i'd like to go a lot further and will in other legislative efforts. this amendment is really a commonsense effort that's a critical first step to right those wrongs. it would simply require that the b.l.m. notify a landowner sitting above mineral rights that they plan to put out for bid award, lease or sell or drilling permit on that land. now the b.l.m. will argue there are notification requirements. what that means is it might be posted on the website or federal register. i can guarantee you that mr. and mrs. smith is not checking the federal register every day and don't know if there are mineral rights underneath their property. they should get a letter in the mail what's happening, if and when there will be development on their property and that's a simple, commonsense step that would protect american taxpayers from undue and reasonable burdens placed on them, protect property rights
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and i really hope it's not controversial and that we can adopt this amendment and i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman's time is reserved. for what purpose does the gentleman from colorado seek recognition? >> mr. chairman, i rise to claim time in opposition to this amendment. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. lamborn: i want to let my colleague from colorado know that this is a unnecessary amendment and so i would ask people to oppose it. there already is a lot of built-in notification that does take place. i don't know if my colleague is aware of this or not, but when an expression of interest for leasing is made, the b.l.m. requires that all of the surface owners, wherever this expression of interest for notified plies to, is by mail. secondly, before a lease -- excuse me -- a permit is issued, there is another notification to the surface owners of wherever that lease
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is located. thirdly, under the nepa process , the -- before the leases are even issued, the public is notified. and i know this amendment talks about notifying everyone within one mile. the public notification is a lot broader than just one mile, so it's actually -- current law does more than what this amendment calls for. but there are two different steps in addition to the public notice where the surface landowner actually is notified by mail, by a good faith effort required by the bureau of land management for federal lands. on top of all that, mr. chairman, i would ask opposition for this amendment because it's poorly written. it's ambiguous as to whether it's only applying to federal lands or is broader and would include tribal lands, private lands and things way out of the jurisdiction of the bureau of land management.
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but in any case, even if it would just apply to the federal lands, it's unnecessary, and because of the different steps that are required under the language of this amendment, it would add a lot of paperwork and red tape and really not accomplish anything more than what is clearly accomplished two or three times under existing law. so for all those reasons, mr. chairman, i would ask that we oppose this amendment. i know it's well-intentioned, but the law already takes care of this. this amendment, besides being poorly written, would a lot of time and red tape to the process. for those reasons i urge opposition to the amendment. i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman's time is reserved. the gentleman from colorado, mr. polis. mr. polis: thank you, mr. chairman. i wish this amendment wasn't necessary. there are hundreds if if not thousands of homeowners in colorado who fail to be notified by the b.l.m.
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now, there is a good faith effort requirement there's no system in place to ensure that the person gets a notification. so in effect, what happens is the agency will sign off. we made a good faith effort, couldn't find who the property owner was, it's posted in the federal register or in the newspaper, in an ad that the homeowner is extremely unlikely ever to see. what we're simply saying, have a step to implement this directive that already exists, give this meaning, give this teeth, make sure that homeowners are actually notified in the mail, that there's an effort to actually find out who they are and not just a bureaucratic signoff we don't know who they are and they'll never going to find out until a truck drives onto their property. it's a real simple, commonsense solution. i ask my colleagues to adopt it. i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from colorado, mr. lamborn. mr. lamborn: mr. chairman, just to finish this, i would say this is an unnecessary amendment because there are already two if not three different times that the notice
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to the surface owner already has to take place, already takes place. once to the public at large, twice to the surface owner in particular. secondly, this is poorly written. i'm afraid that it does not just refer strictly to federal lands that the b.l.m. controls but this could apply to tribal lands and private lands so it makes a mess in that regard. and thirdly, it goes one mile away -- the current law does fer to the surface owner and accomplishes the things that the proponent of the amendment wants to accomplish. so it's unnecessary and for those reasons, mr. chairman, i would urge opposition to this amendment, and i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from colorado, mr. polis. mr. polis: thank you. i respect my good friend and colleague from colorado.
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part of the goal this amendment is to ensure that the full area of disruption receives notification. so where you have a suburban subdevelopment, it's one thing for the owner under which the activity is occurring to get notice, but keep in mind the activity also has an impact certainly within a mile radius of activity. in terms of loud noise, trucks, etc. families may choose to leave town, others may choose to stick it out and make sure they're prepared for whatever activity will occur when it occurs. but clearly if there is notification aspects within the law, which they are, they're insufficient, because i come before you telling you there are homeowners in colorado who have no prior word of extraction activity on their land until literally they see it occurring. they see trucks, they see people, they go out and say, what are you doing? they say, we're getting ready to drill. this happens in my state. this amendment would make sure that more than a good faith effort is simply signed off
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from some bureaucrat and waived, there's a real empty of implementation, we give rulemaking to the b.l.m. to come up with a system for notifying homeowners and adjacent property owners about, traction work that's occurring for -- extraction work that's occurring for mineral rights under where they live. i hope this is a basis of common sense from which we can build, build the concept of homeowner protections and surface owner rights to balance the rights that mineral owners have. certainly transparency and notification is a simple one, an easy one for the b.l.m. to implement. that's all my amendment would do. i urge my colleagues to vote yes, and i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from colorado, mr. polis. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the noes have it. mr. polis: mr. chairman, on that i request a recorded vote. the chair: pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, further proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from colorado will be postponed. it's now in order to consider amendment number 25 printed in
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house report 114-359. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. barton: mr. speaker, i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 25 printed in house report 114-359 offered by mr. barton of texas. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 542, the gentleman from texas, mr. barton, and a member opposed, each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas. mr. barton: i thank the speaker. mr. speaker, i offer this amendment on behalf of myself, mr. cuellar, mr. flores, mr. conaway and mr. mccaul. this amendment is almost identical to h.r. 702 which passed the house floor on a strong bipartisan basis several months ago, 261 votes, i believe, was the -- those in favor of it. this is necessary because while we had hopped that h.r. 702 would be brought up in the other body as a stand-alone bill, it doesn't appear that's going to happen this session
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and so we want to try to put this on another vehicle that the senate may yet bring up. will also point out there are a number of larger bills in play that there's a possibility we'll try to attach it to those also. in any event, this amendment is true to the bill that was brought up on the house floor. it is identical with two exceptions. one, it does not have the maritime provision to provide some additional funding for our maritime merchant marine fleet, because that was not germane. not because we don't support it but it was not germane. and, two, we had a requirement that we do a study of the strategic petroleum reserve. that is no longer necessary because that part of our bill has become law. other than that, all the amendments that were offered on both sides and accepted are in this amendment that's before us today. we are the third largest oil
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producer in the world. we have the capability to significantly increase our production, but under current law, mr. speaker, that's not possible because it's prohibited by law that was passed in 1975. the gist of this bill is it would repeal that ban, allow american crude oil to be put on the world market just like our refined oil products are today. won't ask everybody that voted for -- those that didn't see the light before we'll give you a second chance tonight to vote for it. with that i want to reserve the balance of my time and see if there is anybody willing to stand up and be in opposition to this amendment. the chair: the gentleman's time has reserved. for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? mr. garamendi: oh, i think i'll speak in opposition. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. .
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mr. garamendi: i thank you, mr. chairman. ever since i got involved in public policy, which was about 40 years ago, this nation has been crying for energy independence. i remember my very first campaign, 1974, during the oil energy crisis. you know, when there was, all around the world, no oil available and no gas available. and so we wanted to be energy independent. we're actually getting close to it, although we continue to import 25% of our crude oil. so -- but maybe we're on the cusp of being energy independent. and so what does big oil want to do? well, it's not good enough that they should be the wealthiest of all corporations in america. and the world. they want to take our precious and almost energy independent oil and export it.
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where's it going to go? well, who wears the market? well, china, for sure, wants oil. they're going to need to double their import of oil. so where's big oil going to go? with our precious natural resource that we have, for at least the last 40 years, been trying to use to achieve energy independence? my good friend from texas, why would you give away to big oil our energy independence? why would we do that? and by the way, the 1975 law does not prohibit, it puts the hand of the government, the president, and the secretary of commerce on the spigot and if it is not in the -- in america's interest to import, they can shut the speaker down. there's no protection in this. the only protection is for big oil. $30 billion a year of
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additional revenue. for big oil. as if they don't already have enough. and what about the rest of the nation? shouldn't this natural resource asset of america be shared? it could be. control the spigot to the benefit of people at the gas pump. my farmers who need chemicals, fertilizer coming from the oil industry, they need the pipes, they need all of the material and they need the diesel. oh. we can forget about the farmers. after all, big oil wants to ship our precious natural resource oil overseas. probably to china. so, why don't we put a control on this, if it's not in the public interest, don't do it. make sure that our refineries, $8.7 billion of refining infrastructure will not be built as a result of this export. whose jobs are those?
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the american middle class, which apparently all of us want to protect and enhance. those are middle class jobs. $8.7 billion of infrastructure not going to be built in our refineries. well, this is not a big deal. after all, big oil wants it, it's no big deal that we would take, as we move toward energy ndependence, the one product that is available, that could diminish the 25% oil we currently import, no, we're simply going to ship it offshore, for whose benefit? are the american mariners going to benefit from that? no. are the american ship builders going to benefit from that? no. not at all. who's going to benefit? well, some in oil patch will benefit, for sure. certainly the big oil companies will benefit.
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but will the american consumer at the gasoline pump benefit? i've seen the studies. you can design a study that will show it means nothing. but remember this. $30 billion of oil a year is going to leave this country. for whose benefit? for big oil? not for the person at the gas pump. not for the farmer buying the diesel. not for the farmer that wants to buy the fertilizer. give it away. let them have it. as if they don't already have enough. for a century big oil has been subsidized by the american public. enough already. nough already. i don't think this is a good idea. i don't think it's a good idea to take our crude oil and allow it to be shipped overseas with absolutely no restrictions whatsoever. you want a strong vote on this,
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then make it a strong no vote. i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas. mr. barton: we'll put the gentleman from california down as undecided on the bill. and with that i would yield one minute to the gentleman from college station, heaven, texas, bill flores, one minute. the chair: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. flores: mr. chair, i rise in strong support of this amendment. that would strengthen our nation's energy -- energy, its security, its jobs and its economy. you've heard some interesting rhetoric tonight. but here are the facts. this amendment results in five key benefits to our country. first, it benefits the american consumer with resulting overall lower energy prices. this particularly benefits lower income and lower middle income americans, providing greater economic security for those hardworking families. number two, it benefits the american producer and allows them to further reinvest in our
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domestic energy infrastructure, further improving our energy security and good paying american jobs. and most of those companies are small, independent oil and gas companies, not the major companies you just heard talked about. number three, it benefits our geopolitical standing and strengthens ties with our global friends and allies. and it hurts those countries like russia, iran and venezuela, who are opposed to american interests. number four, it benefits the downstream refining community, as lower prices will stimulate volume demand for the refined products, this gives them more financial capital to hire skilled american workers and to reinvest in their operations. number five, it helps cure our trade imbalances. these are five critical reasons why everybody wins if we lift the ban. i would like to thank mr. barton for his work on this important amendment. mr. barton: i yield the gentleman an additional 15 seconds.
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mr. flores: thank you, mr. barton. i would like to thank mr. barton for his work on this important amendment and thank the chairman for his support as well. i strongly encourage my colleagues to support the amendment and the underlying bill and i yield back the balance of my time to mr. barton. mr. barton: may i ask how much time remains on each side, mr. speaker? the chair: the gentleman has 1 3/4 minutes remaining. the gentleman has yielded back his time. mr. barton: so it's my time to close. the chair: the gentleman from texas to close. mr. barton: mr. speaker, i yield myself the balance of the time. i don't see any other speakers on our side. let me simply say that this amendment is about jobs for america. there's only one commodity that we prohibit by law from being exported and it's crude oil. we don't prohibit cotton, we don't prohibit corn, we don't prohibit ethanol, we don't prohibit automobiles, we don't prohibit video games or movies. we only prohibit crude oil. that's number one. number two, since the oil prices have fallen in the last
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13 or 14 months, we have lost over 250,000 jobs in the united states. those aren't just oil patch jobs. those are truck driver jobs, they're warehouse jobs, they're computer programmer jobs. they're restaurant jobs. you name it. those are real jobs. it's estimated, mr. speaker, that we're losing as many as 1,000 jobs a week right now. we repeal this antiquated law, we can put some of those people back to work, we can put american-made oil in the world marketplace. it makes no sense to let iran export oil and we can't let american oil be put on the world market. we don't know who's going to buy the oil, but we do know that the money received for it is going to come back to the united states, it's going to create jobs, it's going to help our economy, it's going to be
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good for every american in every state of the 50 states in the union. vote for this amendment. and with that, mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from texas. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. the gentleman from california. the gentleman from california has requested a recorded vote. pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, further proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from texas will be postponed. pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, proceedings will now resume on those amendments printed in house report 114-359 on which further proceedings were postponed in the following order. amendment number 1 by mr. upton of michigan. amendment number 2 by mr. tonko of new york. amendment number 14 by mr. green of texas. amendment number 17 by mr. bier of virginia. amendment number 19 by ms. schakowsky of illinois. amendment number 22 by mr. tonko of new york. amendment number 23 by ms. castor of florida. amendment number 24 by mr.
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polis of colorado. amendment number 25 by mr. barton of texas. the chair will reduce to two minutes the minimum time for any electronic vote after the first vote in this series. the unfinished business is the request for a recorded vote on amendment number 1 printed in house report 114-359 by the gentleman from michigan, mr. upton, on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the ayes prevailed by voice vote. the clerk will redesignate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 1 printed in house report 1144-359 offered by mr. upton of michigan. the chair: a resorted -- a recorded vote has been requested. those in support of the request for a recorded vote will rise and be counted. a sufficient number having arisen, a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a 15-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the .s. house of representatives.]
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the chair: on this vote the yeas are 246 and the nays are 177. he amendment is adopted. the unfinished business is the request for a recorded vote on amendment number 2 printed in
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house report 114-359 by the gentleman from new york, mr. tonko, on which proceedings were postponed and on which the noes prevailed by voice vote. the clerk: amendment number 2 printed in house report 114-359 offered about mr. tonko of new york. the chair: a recorded vote has been requested. those in support of the request for a recorded vote will se and be counted. a sufficient number having arisen, a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this will be a two-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the chair: on this vote the eas are --
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the chair: on this vote the yeas are 179, the nays are 244. the amendment is not adopted. the unfinished business is the request for a recorded vote on amendment number 14 printed in house report 114-359 by the gentleman from texas, mr. green, on which the proceedings were postponed and on whiches yeas prevailed by voice vote. the clerk will redesignate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 14 printed in house report 114-359 offered by mr. gene green of texas. the chair: a recorded vote has been requested.
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those in support of the request for a recorded vote will rise and be counted. a sufficient number having arisen, a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this will be a two-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the .s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: the yeas are 273 and the nays are
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158. the unfinished is a request for a recorded vote printed in house report by the gentleman from virginia, mr. beyer on which further proceedings were postponed and the yeas were prevailed. the clerk: amendment number 17 rinted in house report 117-359 offered by mr. beyer of virginia. the speaker pro tempore: a a recorded vote has been requested. a sufficient number having arisen, a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a two-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this te, the yeas are 246 and the amendment is not adopted. the unfinish is reque for a vote on printedeport by the gentleman from drk ms. schakowsky and which the yeas prevailed. the clerk: amendment number 19 rinted in house report 114-35 offered by misschakowsky of illinois. the speaker pro tempore: those in support of thvote will rise and be couted. a recordevote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a
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two-minute vote. [ctioning made possible by the national captioni institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]